Posts Tagged ‘Running’

Burn Baby Burn

Wednesday, July 1st, 2009

Quick Notes on Energy Expenditure and What it Means for Weight Loss

By Catherine Munaco

Owner, CoachMeFit West Bloomfield

As a trainer, I have one basic rule for clients aiming to lose significant amounts of weight: You must know roughly how many calories you consume relative to how many calories your body is burning on a daily basis. Surprisingly, very few people have looked into their energy consumption and expenditure, and instead take what we call “uneducated guesses”. As humans, we tend to underestimate the calories in our food and overestimate the energy we use during our daily routines and workouts. Clients are often reluctant to spend time tediously logging entries into a food diary, and even nutritionists will say that calculating calories in food is a time consuming process. I simply don’t care. I’ve logged my food consumption, its annoying—yes—but vital, read: VITAL, to progress with weight loss. Luckily, online food journals make tracking easier and less time consuming than it used to be (try fitday.com for a free online food journal). If tracking food every day isn’t something you’re likely to stick with, then track for three days (making sure one of those days is on the weekend). Because we tend to be creatures of habit, you’ll get a general idea of how many calories you eat in a typical day. Most likely you’ll be shocked with the amount of calories you’re consuming. If you eat out, be sure to look up calories on the restaurants website, which can also be shocking. I’ll never forget when I learned that my “healthy” Panera salad contained over 30 grams of fat. Simply substituting the dressing would have saved me over 200 calories.

The other half of the equation, of course, is calories expended. Here, we also see inaccurate guesses. Clients will often tell me they went for a long walk, but when I put them on the treadmill they realize how slow they were really moving. For a more accurate calorie count, I usually suggest a heart rate monitor. Cardio machines typically have a spot for calories burned in a workout session, but even they can overestimate. One time, the treadmill said I burned 800 calories in a 40 minute run; my heart rate monitor said 425. (I would have loved to believe the treadmill, of course, but a female my size would have to run faster than 6 minute miles to expend that much energy in 40 minutes, and I don’t think I’ve ever run a 5:50 minute mile, let alone 8 of them.)

Additionally, my clients usually have no idea how many calories they use at rest. The most simplistic estimation of this value is what exercise physiologists refer to as resting metabolic rate, or RMR. RMR accounts for the energy required by cells to maintain normal bodily functions and homeostasis at rest. Similar to RMR, basal metabolic rate, or BMR, is the minimum energy needed to sustain vital life functions. In laboratory conditions, BMR is typically only slightly less than RMR, so the two tend to be considered interchangeable. Regardless, knowing your daily BMR or RMR is crucial to weight loss. Again, people are often shocked to learn how little they burn at rest. Equally frustrating—BMR is lower in females (a result of lower muscle masses as compared to males) and decreases with age. To calculate your age, gender, and weight adjusted BMR, go to http://www.bmi-calculator.net/bmr-calculator/

Aside from physical activity and exercise, BMR ends up being the most important form of calorie expenditure simply because we spend most of our day at rest. Having a basic understanding of our daily energy needs allows us to regulate and change the foods we eat to better accommodate energy expenditure. In the long run, we want eating HABITS that fit our energy needs. Knowing BMR also highlights the importance of physical activity. On days that we put in a significant workout, our caloric expenditure is as much as 25% greater than our resting levels. That means we can eat more! Exercise increases weight loss when calories are carefully monitored and helps to buffer “bad eating” days (you know you’ve had ‘em).

Research has also shown that exercise can have a counter effect on the natural decrease in BMR with age. Age-related decreases in BMR are typically explained by loss of muscle tissue and increase in fat tissue. Some changes in metabolic activity for muscle also exist as we age, but for the most part we lose active muscle tissue, and therefore burn less calories at rest. However, weight training can help maintain muscle mass that we would otherwise lose, thus keeping basal metabolic rates from plummeting. Some research has even suggested that regular aerobic training in older individuals causes increases in BMR with no increase in muscle mass.

BMR often decreases with age

BMR often decreases with age

So what does this mean for the average person? It means that you need to keep moving and you need to know what you’re consuming relative to what you’re eating. Weight loss only occurs when energy out is greater than energy in, but if we don’t at least have some general idea of what our individual caloric consumption and usage is, we can’t begin to know what to change to see results. Is it a pain in the butt? For some of us, yes. Is it necessary? YES. Fitness is a lifestyle, not a temporary fix. Knowing what your body is doing is the first step to changing habits and creating new patterns for a lifetime of health and wellbeing. Smaller pant sizes are the satisfying bonus.

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1 Month to Go!

Friday, May 1st, 2009

Greetings all of you runners. Congratulations on making it this far in your training. The hard and heavy miles are setting in and it’s now time to really take care of your body. Remember here, it’s not when you are running that your are getting stronger, it’s when you are recovering! What I mean is, make sure you are enjoying your cross-training and rest days. At this point we all need to take care of our bodies as the workload is reaching it’s high point and the rest from that is of utmost importance. Are you remembering to take in enough water? Are you spending an extra 10 minutes after every run to stretch? One more tip is to make sure that you are getting high quality nutrients back into your system within 45 minutes of finishing your runs. Your body will need them to recover from the past run and prepare and store energy for your upcoming run. Train hard, listen to what your body is telling you, and have fun. Let me repeat the key concept for this week. “It’s not when your running that your body is getting stronger, it’s when your recovering.”

Here is also a quick update from Mike our runner.

Week of 4/20 running summary – Mike Ritsema:
 
Monday               5 miles in 39 minutes
Tuesday               5 miles in 40 minutes @ 142 bpm & 500 calories
Wednesday        Rest
Thursday             9 miles in 79 minutes @ 136 bpm avg. & 868 calories
Friday                   Rest
Saturday              Rest
Sunday                 9 miles in 80 minutes @ 137 bpm avg. & 952 calories
 
Notes & thoughts:
It was a busy week with a wedding and graduation commitment as well as business travel.
                Therefore, the schedule changed a little.  I felt pretty good on the 9 mile runs.  I am concerned about a 15 mile run though.

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YOU!

Friday, April 24th, 2009

Hello again everybody. It has been two weeks since we updated you on what our ginea pig Mike has been up to. So here is his latest. Mike seems to have followed the last blog entry and bought himself a new pair of shoes. Can you relate? Have you guys upped your water intake and stretching and core work? Keep at it, it will pay off. Stay focused on the prize, enjoy the nice spring weather, and continue becoming the runner, and person, you know you can be.

Week of 4/6 running summary – Mike Ritsema:
 
Monday               Rest
Tuesday               4 miles in 27 minutes @ 152 bpm
Wednesday        4.5 miles in 40 minutes at 135 bpm
Thursday             Rest
Friday                   7 miles in 56 minutes at 132 – 162 bpm & 565 cal.
Saturday              7 miles in 60 minutes at 141 – 143 bpm
Sunday                 Rest
 
Notes & thoughts:
I actually felt better on Saturday for the 7 miles than on Friday!
I do feel like I lack the energy at times.   Not so much the cardio, but just plain energy to burn.
I’m interested in better understanding this energy burn thing.
 
 
Week of 4/13 running summary – Mike Ritsema:
 
Monday               5 miles in 37 ½ minutes & 505 calories
Tuesday               Rest – busy
Wednesday        5 miles
Thursday             Rest
Friday                   8 miles in 67 minutes at 133 – 143 bpm & 828 cal.
Saturday              8 miles in 65 minutes at 143 – 143 bpm & 800 cal.
Sunday                 Rest
 
Notes & thoughts:
8 miles is a long haul alone.  My brother, Randy, helped me along for 5 miles on Saturday.  That helped.
These long runs are work, but building confidence.   I’m developing a nasty blister on the arch of my right foot.
I’m concerned.  I also am amazed by how my heart settle in at about 135 bpm in the middle of a long run. 
I also bought my annual – traditional new pair of shoes today.  That’ll help I’m sure.  I am paranoid about a pair of 9’s this weekend.
 
Michael Ritsema
i3 Business Solutions, llc
accelerating business results

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Tips for you Newbies (beginners)

Friday, April 10th, 2009

Hello everyone. I trust this entry finds you enjoying your training and working hard towards your goals. The picture will make sense at the end of the entry, so read on. For this entry I would like to address everyone who would consider themselves a beginner when it comes to following a running routine, or just to running in general. Being three weeks into this program I am sure you have it figured out how to structure your life around the program and also how your body is reacting to the training. Stay motivated at this point as it is now that your body is really making changes and producing visible results when it comes to your training. This can be a tough point in anyones training program as the excitement of starting has worn down and the realization of what lies ahead is in sight.  Due to this mental “road block” I thought I would put out a few suggestions, tips, and things to consider, just to keep you on track and getting maximal results from you efforts.

#1-WATER= We have all heard that the human body is somewhere between 60-70% water, and it’s true, and thats very important for your health. Just a simple 5% reduction in your bodies hydration status will result in a 20% decrease in it’s performance. That includes your performance in running, walking, thinking, recovering. When it comes to to doing a running/walking program such as this, it is absolutely essential that you are drinking enough water. Water helps your body flush out the bad, and circulate the good. It helps your body perform better, recover better, and flush out fat better. I could go on and on here, but what I am saying people is…DRINK MORE WATER!

#2-Shoes= If you did not buy a new pair of shoes in order to undertake this program, or very recently before it, I would suggest visiting your local running store and getting properly fitted for a running shoe that is specific to your needs. All of this training can take a strain on the body, and all of that stress and pounding that happens in running, starts with your feet. It is actually well proven that worn out shoes cause all types of running injuries. Shin splints, knee pain, muscle pulls, tightness, hip pain, can all sometimes be traced back to improper and worn out shoes. It would be a small investment that can pay huge dividends. I would hate to have any of you work so hard in your training only to come up injured before the race.

#3-Core Work= When it comes to running and walking, there is no debating the importance of having a strong core. Yes people, there is no substitute here for consistency and “crunches”. Elite runners have been proven to improve their running performance by 5% just by adding in consistent core workouts. I would suggest adding in 5-10 minutes of core work 3-4 days a week following your scheduled run/walk/or workout.

Follow those three suggestions and it will help you perform better, avoid injury, and enjoy your training. Have a great weekend everyone. Here is a funny qoute to finish off, this is what the rest of the world thinks about us runners.

“If morning runners knew how inticing they looked to morning drivers, they would stay home and do crunches”

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The Training Plan…in Action.

Thursday, April 2nd, 2009

http://www.fitnessvenues.com/FCKfiles/Image/sport_specific/hill_running.jpg

We are in the middle of week two of the training plan. I hope you are feeling motivated and positive about the progress you have made so far. Mike has given us another update on how his training has been going, as well as the obstacles that have been in his way. Good job everybody. Keep running, keep recovering, and remember that often the journey teaches you far more than the destination.

Week of 3/23 running summary – Mike Ritsema:

Monday               4 miles pretty hard

Tuesday               4 miles pretty hard

Wednesday        Rest

Thursday             47 minutes at 125 – 142 bpm avg. 135 bpm burned 505 calories

Friday                    4 miles in 34 minutes at 138 bpm

Saturday              Race:  10K – 6.2 miles in 47 minutes = 7:34 / mile

Sunday                 Rest

Notes & thoughts:

I’m a busy guy with lots of responsibilities.   Running is therapy to me.  I like to run and it stabilizes me – reorients me.  But, running isn’t the center of my universe.  I enjoy golf, biking and loafing too.  Besides that, I do run a business which is taking quite a bit of time and energy in this economy.   At my age, 51, my personal challenge includes both motivation and energy.   Sometimes, I just don’t have either to get me out the door.   That’s why I operate best when working out with others in a group.

I find this new workout plan intriguing.  I’ve read and discussed the methodology in the past.   Slowing down my pace to a reasonable burn rate is counterintuitive to me.   I’ve been running for over 35 years.  Brute force always seemed reasonable to me.  And, yes, I do haul around some ‘70s era concepts that may have been improved on over the last few decades.

I’ll continue putting on the miles in as close alignment to the training schedule as I’m able.

Michael Ritsema
i3 Business Solutions, llc

accelerating business results

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Time to lace up the shoes and Hit the pavement!

Wednesday, March 25th, 2009

Choose your level of running fitness, Choose your Goal, and begin following CoachMeFit’s plan for success. Work hard when the plan calls for it, rest when the plan calls for it, and take the first step, it’s always the hardest one.

5k Beginner

Week of:

Day 1

Day 2

Day 3

Day 4

Day 5

Day 6

Day 7

3/23

1.5mi run

Rest

Run/walk 30min (3min:3min)

Rest

1.5mi run

Rest

Cross-train or walk 30min

3/30

1.5mi run

Rest

Run/walk 30min

(4min:2min)

Rest

1.5mi run

Rest

Cross-train or walk 35min

4/6

1.5mi run

Rest

Run/walk 30min

(4min:2min)

Rest

2mi run

Rest

Cross-train or walk 40min

4/13

1.5mi run

Rest

Run/walk 30min

(4min:2min)

Rest

2mi run

Rest

Cross-train or walk 45min

4/20

2mi run

Rest

Run/walk 30min

(5min:1min)

Rest

2mi run

Rest

Cross-train or walk 45min

4/27

2mi run

Rest

Run/walk 30min

(5min:1min)

Rest

2.5mi run

Rest

Cross-train or walk 45min

4/4

2mi run

Rest

Run/walk 30min

(5min:1min)

Rest

2.5mi run

Rest

Cross-train or walk 45min

4/11

2mi run

Rest

2mi Maxiamal steady state

Rest

3mi run

Rest

Cross-train or walk 45min

4/18

2.5mi run

Rest

2.5mi run

Rest

2.5mi run

Rest

Cross-train or walk 45min

4/25

2.5mi run

Rest

2mi run

Rest

1.5mi run

Rest

RACE DAY

5k Intermediate

Week of:

Day 1

Day 2

Day 3

Day 4

Day 5

Day 6

Day 7

3/23

3mi run

Rest

3mi run

Cross-train 30min

Rest

4mi run

Rest or Cross-train 30min

3/30

3mi run

Rest

4mi run

Cross-train 30min

Rest

4mi run

Rest or Cross-train 30min

4/6

3mi run

Rest

4mi run

Cross-train 35min

Rest

5mi run

Rest or Cross-train 30min

4/13

4mi run

Rest

5x3min TI with 3min recovery

Cross-train 35min

Rest

6mi run

Rest or Cross-train 30min

4/20

5mi run

Rest

5x4min TI with 4min recovery

Cross-train 40min

Rest

6mi run

Rest or Cross-train 30min

4/27

5mi run

Rest

8x30sec sprints with 90sec recovery

Cross-train 40min

Rest

7mi run

Rest or Cross-train 30min

4/4

5mi run

Rest

10x30sec sprints with 90sec recovery

Cross-train 45min

Rest

7mi run

Rest or Cross-train 30min

4/11

6mi run

Rest

12x20sec sprints with 2min recovery

Cross-train 45min

Rest

7mi run

Rest or Cross-train 30min

4/18

6mi run

Rest

4mi run

Cross-train 45min

Rest

6mi run

Rest or Cross-train 30min

4/25

5mi run

Rest

4mi run

Rest

3mi run

Rest

RACE DAY

10K Beginner

Week of:

Day 1

Day 2

Day 3

Day 4

Day 5

Day 6

Day 7

3/23

2.5mi run

Rest

2.5mi run

Rest

Cross-train 30min

3mi run

Rest or Cross-train 30min

3/30

2.5mi run

Rest

3mi run

Rest

Cross-train 30min

3mi run

Rest or Cross-train 30min

4/6

2.5mi run

Rest

3mi run

Rest

Cross-train 30min

3.5mi run

Rest or Cross-train 30min

4/13

3mi run

Rest

3mi run

Rest

Cross-train 35min

4mi run

Rest or Cross-train 30min

4/20

3mi run

Rest

3mi run

Rest

Cross-train 35min

5mi run

Rest or Cross-train 30min

4/27

3mi run

Rest

5x3min TI with 3min recovery

Rest

Cross-train 40min

5mi run

Rest or Cross-train 30min

4/4

3mi run

Rest

5x4min TI with 4min recovery

Rest

Cross-train 40min

5mi run

Rest or Cross-train 30min

4/11

4mi run

Rest

8x30sec sprints with 90sec recovery

Rest

Cross-train 45min

6mi run

Rest or Cross-train 30min

4/18

4mi run

Rest

5mi run

Rest

Cross-train 45min

4mi run

Rest or Cross-train 30min

4/25

5mi run

Rest

4mi run

Rest

3mi run

Rest

RACE DAY

10k Intermediate

Week of:

Day 1

Day 2

Day 3

Day 4

Day 5

Day 6

Day 7

3/23

4mi run

Cross-train 30min

4mi run

Rest

4mi run

3mi run

Rest

3/30

4mi run

Cross-train 35min

4mi run

Rest

5mi run

3mi run

Rest

4/6

5mi run

Cross-train 35min

4mi run

Rest

6mi run

3mi run

Rest

4/13

5mi run

Cross-train 40min

5x4min TI with 4min recovery

Rest

7mi run

3mi run

Rest

4/20

5mi run

Cross-train 40min

5x5min TI with 5min recovery

Rest

7mi run

4mi run

Rest

4/27

5mi run

Cross-train 45min

6x3min TI with 3min recovery

Rest

8mi run

4mi run

Rest

4/4

6mi run

Cross-train 45min

7x2min TI with 3min recovery

Rest

8mi run

4mi run

Rest

4/11

6mi run

Cross-train 45min

8x1min TI with 2min recovery

Rest

9mi run

4mi run

Rest

4/18

6mi run

Cross-train 45min

4mi run

Rest

6mi run

4mi run

Rest

4/25

6mi run

Rest

5mi run

Rest

4mi run

Rest

RACE DAY

Half-Marathon Beginner

Week of:

Day 1

Day 2

Day 3

Day 4

Day 5

Day 6

Day 7

3/23

4mi run

4mi run

Rest

3mi run

Cross-train 30min

5mi run

Rest

3/30

4mi run

4mi run

Rest

4mi run

Cross-train 30min

6mi run

Rest

4/6

4mi run

5mi run

Rest

4mi run

Rest or Cross-train 35min

6mi run

Rest

4/13

5mi run

5mi run

Rest

4mi run

Rest or Cross-train 35min

7mi run

Rest

4/20

5mi run

5mi run

Rest

4mi run

Rest or Cross-train 40min

8mi run

Rest

4/27

5mi run

5mi run

Rest

5mi run

Rest or Cross-train 40min

8mi run

Rest

4/4

5mi run

6mi run

Rest

5mi run

Rest or Cross-train 40min

9mi run

Rest

4/11

6mi run

6mi run

Rest

5mi run

Rest or Cross-train 45min

10mi run

Rest

4/18

6mi run

5mi run

Rest

6mi run

Rest or Cross-train 45min

5mi run

Rest

4/25

6mi run

Rest

5mi run

Rest

4mi run

Rest

RACE DAY

Half-Marathon Intermediate

Week of:

Day 1

Day 2

Day 3

Day 4

Day 5

Day 6

Day 7

3/23

4mi run

Cross-train 30min

4mi run

Rest

4mi run

6mi run

Rest

3/30

5mi run

Cross-train 30min

4mi run

Rest

5mi run

6mi run

Rest

4/6

5mi run

Cross-train 35min

5mi run

Rest

5mi run

7mi run

Rest

4/13

5mi run

Cross-train 35min

5mi run

Rest

6mi run

8mi run

Rest

4/20

5mi run

Cross-train 40min

6mi run

Rest

6mi run

9mi run

Rest

4/27

6mi run

Cross-train 40min

6mi run

Rest

6mi run

10mi run

Rest

4/4

6mi run

Cross-train 45min

7mi run

Rest

5mi run

11mi run

Rest

4/11

6mi run

Cross-train 45min

7mi run

Rest

5mi run

12mi run

Rest

4/18

6mi run

Cross-train 30min

6mi run

Rest

6mi run

8mi run

Rest

4/25

6mi run

Rest

6mi run

Rest

4mi run

Rest

RACE DAY

All Programs:

*normal run days – choose a comfortable pace in which it would be easy to hold a conversation at.

*TI = Tempo Intervals. These should be at a maximal steady state effort, or in other words, hold the fastest pace possible throughout every interval. (The first interval should be the same pace as your last). This is a high intensity workout but make sure you do not go out too fast on your first interval as you may not be able to hold that pace. Recovery is a light jog.

*Speed work (20 or 30sec intervals) are sprints but again, you want all intervals to be at a pretty equal pace. If anything make your last few your fastest.

*Run/walk intervals – the running portion should be slightly faster than your normal run days. Don’t be afraid to push yourself a little!

*Cross-training – low to moderate intensity workouts of your choice.

*Resistance training can be personalized by your trainer to fit your needs and goal.

25k

Week of:

Day 1

Day 2

Day 3

Day 4

Day 5

Day 6

Day 7

3/23

4mi run

Rest or Cross-train 30min

4mi run

Rest

6mi run

4mi run

Rest

3/30

4mi run

Rest or Cross-train 30min

4mi run

Rest

7mi run

5mi run

Rest

4/6

5mi run

4mi max steady state

Rest or Cross-train 30min

Rest or Cross-train 30min

7mi run

7mi run

Rest

4/13

5mi run

5mi max steady state

Rest or Cross-train 30min

Rest or Cross-train 30min

8mi run

8mi run

Rest

4/20

6mi run

5mi max steady state

Rest or Cross-train 30min

Rest or Cross-train 30min

9mi run

9mi run

Rest

4/27

6mi run

Rest or Cross-train

6mi run

Rest

7mi run

7mi run

Rest

4/4

7mi run

6mi run

Rest

5mi run

Rest

RACE DAY

5mi run

*Max steady state = run at your fastest pace that you can maintian throughout the entire run.

*On the consecutive “Rest or Cross-train” days, choose one day to rest and one to cross-train light.

*On normal run days, keep your heart rate low (125-135bpm).

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Dexter/Ann Arbor Run, the training plan.

Wednesday, March 18th, 2009

It’s 74 days away! Plenty of time to start your training program NOW to achieve your running goals. Keep an eye on the CoachMeFit blog as we are about to roll out a training plan for all runners for all distances. We will publish a training program for beginner and intermediate runners who are planning on running the Dexter Ann Arbor run. If you are interested in having a plan that will keep you focused, accountable, and injury free, we will publish a running routine for the 5k run, the 10k run, as well as the 1/2 Marathon. We also will be posting on a weekly basis an update from a local runner, Mike Ritsema, who is going to follow the training plan for the 1/2 marathon. Mike will give us updates on how he feels and performs, as well as what obstacles get in the way of his success. Be sure to check in to encourage him, relate to him, and to view his picture so you know what he looks like as he runs by on May 31st.  Have a great day everybody, enjoy the warming weather and RUN HARD!

http://www.dexterannarborrun.com/

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