Posts Tagged ‘Personal Training’

Sugar and Weight Gain

Wednesday, November 23rd, 2011
 
Kelly Kalbfleisch, NPTI Certified Personal Trainer
Manager of CoachMeFit Ann Arbor

 

I am angry, angry at sugar! 

Due to an injury, I have been very limited in my workouts for about 11 weeks now.  Being a trainer, I know that when something like this happens, it is imperative that my diet be as flawless as possible (which is extremely hard for a girl who loves to eat).  This is where my hatred of sugar comes into play.

I dislike yogurt, but I thought I would give it another shot (for about the 50th time).  I found a few flavors that looked like they may taste ok.  First one was great.  Second one was great as well.  I started thinking something must be wrong with this yogurt if I actually like it.  For some reason, I didn’t bother to turn this little yummy of cup of goodness around to view the nutrition facts, which I typically do before I purchase any food.  It’s low fat = great. It’s low calorie = great.  Then I see it and mid bite I throw the half eaten yogurt in the trash.  Out of the 25 grams of Carbohydrates 22 grams of them are SUGAR!  WHAT?!?!  I could not believe it.  Well, actually, I could have believed it if I would have been thinking straight.  I blame it on the lack of exercise :)  

This led me to start thinking about all my clients who are struggling with their diet and weight loss.  Low fat and low calorie does not mean the product is good for you.  I found a great article that explains what sugar does in the body and why it causes people to gain weight. 

“Isn’t she sweet?” “Rose are Red, Violets are Blue, Sugar is sweet and so are You.” “Visions of sugar plums danced in their head.” “Come on over here, Sugar.” It is everywhere. Sugar, which used to be a rare treat, is in almost every home today. It has woven its way into the fabric of our society. Grandma’s cookies, birthday cakes, Christmas candy, Valentine’s chocolates, the pies and pastries at every celebration feast. Sugar is everywhere.

So, if it is that prominent it can’t be that bad can it? Well, look at the rise in popularity, and availability, of sugar and you will see a similar rise in obesity rates. The research is still out on the different types of naturally occurring sugars and all of the sugar alcohols and artificial sweeteners, so we will focus on refined sugar. This includes white, cane sugar and brown sugar.

First, let’s take a look at what sugar does. Glucose is used by the body for energy. The muscles and organs use it to supply the energy they need to perform their regular functions. In order for the glucose to get to the cells that need it there needs to be a transporter. This is where insulin comes in. It transports the glucose to the cells with the open receptors. Once all receptor sites in the brain, other organs, and muscles are closed the insulin then takes the glucose to storage sites (fat stores.) Most foods can be broken down into glucose for energy but it takes time through the digestive process.

Refined sugar is rapidly converted to glucose in the body. That is why you get a buzz or sugar “high” right after you eat sugar. The problem is that because there is so much sugar in the system after a sugary snack the body cannot utilize all of the glucose so the body releases more insulin to rapidly get the glucose out of the system. The easiest way for the body to do that is to shuffle the excess into fat stores quickly. Then you crash. The body now wants the extra energy, but the energy has been stored away so your energy levels drop to the floor.

So, as you can see the influx of sugar causes the body to quickly take all of the excess energy flowing through the blood stream and put it in fat stores. Not a positive situation for a dieter. Since they are trying to lose fat, not gain it.

So, it’s easy then, just don’t add sugar to my foods and drinks, right? That is only a small piece of it. While this will help, it is not the complete solution. Sugar is hidden in many of our foods. One place people are surprised to find so much sugar is in the low-fat and no-fat foods. To make up for the taste lost by eliminating the fat, food manufacturers dump in extra sugar. A fat free cake may have almost twice as much sugar as the regular alternative. Drinks are another area of concern. Look at soft drinks, they are almost completely sugar, with almost 65 grams of sugar in a bottle.

Sugar can quickly sabotage fat loss efforts, but it may not be as simple as throwing out the sugar bowl. Reading labels is important. Food companies seldom list “sugar” in the ingredients. It will usually be sucrose, dextrose, or some other “-ose” item. Looking at the nutrient breakdown will be a good indicator. Under carbohydrates, companies now have to show sugar and fiber content. If a food has 15 grams of carbohydrates per serving and 12 of those are sugar you might want to find another choice. Don’t let these little white granules destroy your diet. Read labels carefully, avoid extra sugar, and eat a mix of nutrients during your meals for a more even blood sugar level.

article By Jennifer Olsen

My advice: READ LABELS…..always!!

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Plan Ahead to Prepare Your Meals!

Wednesday, October 5th, 2011

Kelly Kalbfleisch, NPTI Certified Personal Trainer

Manager of CoachMeFit Ann Arbor


What do you eat for breakfast and lunch?  Are you eating on the fly or feel you have no time for lunch?  I’m a firm believer, and I do this myself, in preparing meals for breakfast and lunch on one particular day during the week.  This way, I have everything in the fridge ready for me to grab to take to work.  I’ve fallen victim to the “I didn’t have time to eat” or “I have to eat whatever is fast” excuses.  I am now prepared and even if I only have 10 minutes to eat, I have healthy food instead of take-out.  I found this article that has really good tips to help you get focused and prepared.

“You wouldn’t start your day, go on vacation, or show up to a job interview without a plan, right? So think of meal prep and packing your cooler as your plan for a healthy body.  Your biggest obstacle is going to be managing your time so that getting fit and healthy doesn’t compete with the rest of your commitments.  Prioritizing and planning ahead will actually make life easier and help facilitate your success in the long term.  While it may seem trivial and even stressful at times, preparedness is one of the most important elements of a healthy lifestyle.  Having everything packed and ready to go will be less stressful than leaving your meal choices up to chance and heading to whatever take-out joint is nearby at mealtime.

Try these tips:

1.       Schedule some prep time: A lot of people (including myself) use Sundays as our shop and prep day.  Pick a day when you have a few free hours to buy and prepare your food for the week.

2.       Pack Cook-Free Snacks: Toss these items into your bag for effortless re energizing:

Raw almonds

Protein Powder

Low-fat String Cheese

Chopped Veggies

Fruit

Ezekiel Bread

Hummus

3.       Get yourself a cooler: Invest in a good, manageable-sized cooler (12-can size or larger) for storing your meals and snacks.  Pack it the night before and store in the fridge so you can grab it and go.

4.       Don’t forget your Gym Bag: Being prepared doesn’t stop with meals.  Pack your gym clothes and sneakers the night before, not as you’re flying out the door.”

-Oxygen Magazine

Engrave this word into your brain:  PREPARE

If you need more tips on what foods to prepare and/or pack, ask your trainer!

 

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5 Ways to Jumpstart Your Fat Loss

Tuesday, August 2nd, 2011
Kelly Kalbfleisch, NPTI Certified Personal Trainer
Manager of CoachMeFit Ann Arbor

Fall is fast approaching.  If you’ve had a little too much enjoyment in terms of BBQ and beverages this summer you may need a kick start for the fall.  Here are a few tips to get you back on track.  Set some goals and burn some of that unwanted and unhealthy fat!!

1. Count your steps

Not literally, of course, but by using a pedometer and recording how many steps you take each day. According to The Cooper Institute for Aerobic Research, 10,000 steps a day will get you started on the path to fat loss and cardiovascular health. Some good ways to add to your count? Take the stairs; ditch the email and walk over to the person sitting down the hall instead; or walk with a buddy at lunch.

2. Eat more

You’ve heard it before and we’ll say it again: plan to eat six small meals throughout your day to control your caloric intake. You’ll give your body more fuel to tackle those 10,000 steps!

3. Sleep more

Ok, cut out on the late night talk-show circuit tonight and hit the sack! Studies reveal that two hormones are responsible for your need to feed: ghrelin and leptin. Ghrelin tells your body it’s hungry, while leptin tells your body it’s full. When you don’t sleep, ghrelin thrives and so will your appetite, so tonight be sure to get your vitamin “zzzz.”

4. Lift weights

The healthier your muscles are the more they will aid in your showdown against fat. Weight training boosts your metabolism and that, in turn, will melt fat and keep your body incinerating all day.

5. Fiber + protein = fat loss

This twosome helps cut cravings by keeping you satisfied longer by breaking down food at a slower rate in your body. Before the day is through, whip up a protein shake, steam some leafy green veggies or pack dried fruit for your afternoon snack. Whatever it is, just make a point of doing it!

 Article from Oxygenmag.com

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Shrimp Pesto Pasta

Wednesday, April 27th, 2011

Kelly Kalbfleisch, NPTI Certified Personal Trainer
Manager of CoachMeFit Ann Arbor

This week I wanted to share one of my favorite recipes with you.  Enjoy!!

Ingredients:

 4 oz Barilla Plus penne pasta

12–14 medium-size precooked, peeled shrimp

 3 c chopped baby spinach

1 tomato, chopped

3 Tbsp ready-made pesto OR  pesto dry mix and add water and oil.

3 Tbsp crumbled Gorgonzola cheese

2 Tbsp diced walnuts

How to Make it:

1.  Boil the pasta according to the package directions. 

2.  If you’re using frozen shrimp, defrost them by running warm water over them.

3.  Drain the pasta.

4.  Transfer the pasta to a large bowl and add the remaining ingredients, stirring well to help wilt the spinach and mix in the pesto. Makes 2 servings

 

EXTRA CREDIT

Eat with mixed greens and two or three slices of raw tomato, sprinkled lightly with salt and drizzled with some balsamic vinaigrette.

 

Per Serving (Including salad):  490 calories, 27 grams (g) protein, 47 g carbohydrates, 22 g fat (6 g saturated), 8 g fiber, 515 milligrams sodium

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Stick With It!

Wednesday, March 16th, 2011

Sticking With It!
-Joseph Ash, NASM-CPT
Manager CoachMeFit West Bloomfield

There aren’t many people out there that haven’t met a fitness goal, and then let it go to waste. Whether it’s those ten pounds you just took off, or running three days a week. Once we have met a goal it’s very easy to fall back into your old routine of eating junk and being inactive. Instead of making a one month fitness goal look farther into the future, and then make short term goals to get you there.

You Determine Your Own Fitness Level
by Shawn Lebrun
Did you know that how you live, day to day, determines the level of fitness and muscularity you’ll achieve?
It’s true, if you have a lifestyle that supports weight(fat) loss, you will not have to worry about being overweight. If your lifestyle is not supportive of fat loss and staying fit, then it really doesn’t matter what you do in the gym, your results will be limited.

It’s when you expect one thing and do something totally opposite trying to get it that there becomes a problem.
If you weight train intensely, do your cardio consistently, and support yourself nutritionally, you’ll get leaner, stronger, and more fit. It happens. Certain steps lead to certain destinations.
But doing things repeatedly that DO NOT support your goals will ensure you DO NOT reach them.

Here are some examples;

It’s the new year and you decide one of your resolutions is to lose weight, specifically 15 pounds of fat. You give up your old, pleasurable lifestyle of eating burgers and fries four nights a week while watching your favorite T.V. shows.
Your new, improved lifestyle involves eating salads and chicken breasts and exercising at the time you used to watch your T.V. shows.
You’re so determined to lose this weight that you sacrifice all sense of fun for the next four weeks while you continue to exercise each night, skipping the fast food and T.V. Four weeks have gone by and you’ve indeed lost your goal weight of 15 pounds. So you figure, hey, I’ve done it, now I can celebrate a bit. I’m going to cut back a bit on the exercise now that I’ve lost the weight I wanted and I think I’ll see what’s on the T.V.

You go to the fridge for a snack and realize you haven’t gone shopping for your healthy foods yet this week.
But hey, there’s still those burgers and fries in the fridge, and you’ve earned a little celebration meal.
Soon, the lost pleasure of eating this delicious food and watching your favorite TV show returns and feels so great. So you do it again the next night, and the next, etc….

The old, unproductive habits have crept back into your life and have now influenced the newer, more productive ones. Your lifestyle is nothing more than what you do, day in and day out. It can either support your fitness goals or hurt them.
If you want to shed some body fat yet you continue to take days off from cardio because you’re not motivated enough to do it, that’s part of your lifestyle.

What you choose to do each day will influence what you get in return.
Make small, improved lifestyle changes that support your fitness goals and continue them until they become habit. Then move on to another small change that benefits you, replacing an older, less productive habit.

In fact, by making lifestyle changes in moderation, you increase the likelihood that these changes will be permanent.
Anytime that you go back to the unproductive lifestyle that caused you to be overweight, the weight you lost can return again.
The solution? Do not rule out all sense of pleasure when you decide to go after your fitness goal.

In fact, your fitness goals of being slimmer, more muscular, and more confident should be more pleasurable than burgers or fries.
If your surrounding environment and habits (cookies, cake, ice cream in front of the TV) do not contribute to your fitness goals, you need to make a change so that what you eat and do each day does.

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1 more rep?

Friday, July 17th, 2009

 

I don’t want to seem like I am ripping on my own profession here, but why do most people only experience benefits from working out when they work with a personal trainer? Why do I personally get better results when I work out with a partner? Why is it that when we are responsible for challenging ourselves, we usually will stop when things get really hard?

I think it is an innate human trait that we have a perceived level of exertion or pain that we think we are capable of being able to handle. This leads me to ask, what is fatigue? Where does it come from? Is fatigue something that is actually physiologically happening making us unable to lift one more rep, or not run that little bit faster? Or is fatigue a psychological stopping point that most of us impose on ourselves?

As I wrestle with this question and it’s implications to not only my training, but my life, I have instituted a new philosophy with my weight training, that I am trying to find news ways in my everyday life to apply it to. When I do a set of 10 reps and my legs are shot and burned out, I try to flip the mental switch and do 11 reps. When I am mentally tired and think I need to relax on the couch and bills or mowing the yard can wait, I realize it, flip the switch, and go to work.

It’s been a long standing philosophy of mine that most people, myself included, have absolutely no idea what we are capable of. Physically, Mentally, Financially, Spiritually. What areas of your life can you do 1 more rep with? Are you placing self imposed limitations on what you are truly capable of? Try it in your training, often the mind will learn things through the body. Make it a habit next week to push one rep past what you thought you could do. And let me know if situations arise in your everyday life where you flipped the switch and decided to ignore the voice telling you to stop, and you did another rep.

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1 Month to Go!

Friday, May 1st, 2009

Greetings all of you runners. Congratulations on making it this far in your training. The hard and heavy miles are setting in and it’s now time to really take care of your body. Remember here, it’s not when you are running that your are getting stronger, it’s when you are recovering! What I mean is, make sure you are enjoying your cross-training and rest days. At this point we all need to take care of our bodies as the workload is reaching it’s high point and the rest from that is of utmost importance. Are you remembering to take in enough water? Are you spending an extra 10 minutes after every run to stretch? One more tip is to make sure that you are getting high quality nutrients back into your system within 45 minutes of finishing your runs. Your body will need them to recover from the past run and prepare and store energy for your upcoming run. Train hard, listen to what your body is telling you, and have fun. Let me repeat the key concept for this week. “It’s not when your running that your body is getting stronger, it’s when your recovering.”

Here is also a quick update from Mike our runner.

Week of 4/20 running summary – Mike Ritsema:
 
Monday               5 miles in 39 minutes
Tuesday               5 miles in 40 minutes @ 142 bpm & 500 calories
Wednesday        Rest
Thursday             9 miles in 79 minutes @ 136 bpm avg. & 868 calories
Friday                   Rest
Saturday              Rest
Sunday                 9 miles in 80 minutes @ 137 bpm avg. & 952 calories
 
Notes & thoughts:
It was a busy week with a wedding and graduation commitment as well as business travel.
                Therefore, the schedule changed a little.  I felt pretty good on the 9 mile runs.  I am concerned about a 15 mile run though.

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YOU!

Friday, April 24th, 2009

Hello again everybody. It has been two weeks since we updated you on what our ginea pig Mike has been up to. So here is his latest. Mike seems to have followed the last blog entry and bought himself a new pair of shoes. Can you relate? Have you guys upped your water intake and stretching and core work? Keep at it, it will pay off. Stay focused on the prize, enjoy the nice spring weather, and continue becoming the runner, and person, you know you can be.

Week of 4/6 running summary – Mike Ritsema:
 
Monday               Rest
Tuesday               4 miles in 27 minutes @ 152 bpm
Wednesday        4.5 miles in 40 minutes at 135 bpm
Thursday             Rest
Friday                   7 miles in 56 minutes at 132 – 162 bpm & 565 cal.
Saturday              7 miles in 60 minutes at 141 – 143 bpm
Sunday                 Rest
 
Notes & thoughts:
I actually felt better on Saturday for the 7 miles than on Friday!
I do feel like I lack the energy at times.   Not so much the cardio, but just plain energy to burn.
I’m interested in better understanding this energy burn thing.
 
 
Week of 4/13 running summary – Mike Ritsema:
 
Monday               5 miles in 37 ½ minutes & 505 calories
Tuesday               Rest – busy
Wednesday        5 miles
Thursday             Rest
Friday                   8 miles in 67 minutes at 133 – 143 bpm & 828 cal.
Saturday              8 miles in 65 minutes at 143 – 143 bpm & 800 cal.
Sunday                 Rest
 
Notes & thoughts:
8 miles is a long haul alone.  My brother, Randy, helped me along for 5 miles on Saturday.  That helped.
These long runs are work, but building confidence.   I’m developing a nasty blister on the arch of my right foot.
I’m concerned.  I also am amazed by how my heart settle in at about 135 bpm in the middle of a long run. 
I also bought my annual – traditional new pair of shoes today.  That’ll help I’m sure.  I am paranoid about a pair of 9’s this weekend.
 
Michael Ritsema
i3 Business Solutions, llc
accelerating business results

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True Blue Pod Squad

Tuesday, April 21st, 2009

The CoachMeFit Corporation has a plethora of University of Michigan alumni on its team including Birmingham studio owner Derek DiGiovanni, West Bloomfield owner Catherine Munaco, VP of Development Brad McFarlane, and CoachMeFit President Lindsay Bogdasarian.

The U of M Alumni Association recently interviewed Lindsay about how a Personal Trainer can change your life.  Click the link below to hear the interview.

University of Michigan Alumni Association Podcast – Lindsay Bogdasarian

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The Training Plan…in Action.

Thursday, April 2nd, 2009

http://www.fitnessvenues.com/FCKfiles/Image/sport_specific/hill_running.jpg

We are in the middle of week two of the training plan. I hope you are feeling motivated and positive about the progress you have made so far. Mike has given us another update on how his training has been going, as well as the obstacles that have been in his way. Good job everybody. Keep running, keep recovering, and remember that often the journey teaches you far more than the destination.

Week of 3/23 running summary – Mike Ritsema:

Monday               4 miles pretty hard

Tuesday               4 miles pretty hard

Wednesday        Rest

Thursday             47 minutes at 125 – 142 bpm avg. 135 bpm burned 505 calories

Friday                    4 miles in 34 minutes at 138 bpm

Saturday              Race:  10K – 6.2 miles in 47 minutes = 7:34 / mile

Sunday                 Rest

Notes & thoughts:

I’m a busy guy with lots of responsibilities.   Running is therapy to me.  I like to run and it stabilizes me – reorients me.  But, running isn’t the center of my universe.  I enjoy golf, biking and loafing too.  Besides that, I do run a business which is taking quite a bit of time and energy in this economy.   At my age, 51, my personal challenge includes both motivation and energy.   Sometimes, I just don’t have either to get me out the door.   That’s why I operate best when working out with others in a group.

I find this new workout plan intriguing.  I’ve read and discussed the methodology in the past.   Slowing down my pace to a reasonable burn rate is counterintuitive to me.   I’ve been running for over 35 years.  Brute force always seemed reasonable to me.  And, yes, I do haul around some ‘70s era concepts that may have been improved on over the last few decades.

I’ll continue putting on the miles in as close alignment to the training schedule as I’m able.

Michael Ritsema
i3 Business Solutions, llc

accelerating business results

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