Posts Tagged ‘Attitude’

Weather Getting You Down? WORK IT OUT!

Friday, April 29th, 2011

Joseph Ash – NASM CPT
Manager CoachMeFit West Bloomfield

Let’s face it, after a couple months of looking outside and seeing nothing but snow and grey clouds, it starts to affect us. You can become less motivated to do anything including getting your workout in. However, the last thing you can see yourself doing, a workout, could be the one thing you need to get over that depression.  Please take a second to read Leonard Holmes’ article below on how exercise can improve mental health.

How Does Exercise Improve Mental Health?
From Leonard Holmes, former About.com Guide

We know that exercise has positive effects on the brain. Researchers at Duke University demonstrated several years ago that exercise has antidepressant properties. Other research has shown that exercise can improve the brain functioning of the elderly and may even protect against dementia. How does exercise improve mental health?

One theory for some of the benefits of exercise include the fact that exercise triggers the production of endorphins. These natural opiates are chemically similar to morphine. They may be produced as natural pain relievers in response to the shock that the body receives during exercise. However, researchers are beginning to question whether endorphins improve mood. Studies are showing that the body’s metabolism of endorphins is complex, and there are likely additional mechanisms involved in the mental health effects of exercise.

Some studies have found that exercise boosts activity in the brain’s frontal lobes and the hippocampus. We don’t really know how or why this occurs. Animal studies have found that exercise increases levels of serotonin, dopamine and norepinephrine. These neurotransmitters have been associated with elevated mood, and it is thought that antidepressant medications also work by boosting these chemicals.

Exercise has also been found to increase levels of “brain-derived neurotrophic factor” (BDNF). This substance is thought to improve mood, and it may play a role in the beneficial effects of exercise. BDNF’s primary role seems to be to help brain cells survive longer, so this may also explain some of the beneficial effects of exercise on dementia.

The bottom line is that most of us feel good after exercise. Physical exercise is good for our mental health and for our brains. Someday we will understand it all better — but we can start exercising today.

Sources:John Briley. “Feel Good After a Workout? Well, Good for You.” The Washington Post, Tuesday, April 25, 2006.
James A. Blumenthal, et al. “Effects of Exercise Training on Older Patients With Major Depression.” Archives of Internal Medicine, October 25, 1999.
Michael Babyak, et al. “Exercise Treatment for Major Depression: Maintenance of Therapeutic Benefit at 10 Months.” Psychosomatic Medicine, September/October 2000

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PEP TALK

Wednesday, March 30th, 2011
Kelly Kalbfleisch, NPTI Certified Personal Trainer
Manager of CoachMeFit Ann Arbor

 

This month a few of my clients have been experiencing negativity with exercise, their progress, outside comments, eating etc…. We all go through it!  Yes, even me.  I thought this week we could all use a little pep talk about how to get through these negative times. 

Negative self-talk is a destructive habit and part of an essential defense mechanism that we often develop to protect ourselves. Many people end up talking themselves out of actions that may be scary or uncomfortable. ‘I can’t do this’ is really just a way of saying ‘I don’t want to deal with the experience of doing this.’ We are all strongly influenced by our feelings, often determining how and what action we ultimately take. If the feeling is uncomfortable, negative self-talk results; then we often decide not to take any action at all.

Many people assume that if a past experience produced a certain result, there is nothing they can do to change that experience in order to produce a different result. ‘I’ve tried every diet there is. I know what I should do; I just can’t do it.’

Please understand that you make the choice not to repeat old patterns of eating, non-exercise, and negative thinking. You have the ability to choose the emotions you have. If you don’t like feeling guilty, frustrated, or doubtful, you can choose not to. You, and no one else, must decide what is comfortable for you. In order to become successful at making healthy choices, you must avoid negative self­ talk and start practicing positive thinking. Positive or negative self-talk plays a big part in your decisions. Be on the look-out for negative self-talk and notice how it influences your choices; notice how it can negatively affect your efforts to change. For example, perhaps you’ve just returned from a week’s vacation where you took a break from exercise and low-fat eating. You tell yourself, ‘I feel so fat. I’m back where I started.’ You feel guilty and frustrated. ‘I don’t have enough will-power to start all over again. Maybe I’m just meant to be overweight.’ Feeling overwhelmed and discouraged, you give up.

First, reflect on the feelings you had before you decided to give up. You basically told yourself that the healthy habits you learned before your vacation were all for nothing and that you have to start over. Ask yourself if these feelings are reasonable. Are you really back to ground zero? Of course not. You accepted change and developed a new way of living; these skills are yours forever. The vacation might even have done you some good: everyone needs a break sometimes. Otherwise, you might have felt deprived and not really enjoyed yourself. It’s time now to tell yourself: ‘It felt good eating whatever I wanted and taking a break from exercising; I had a great time. But now I’m going to focus back on the low-fat, active lifestyle I was enjoying before vacation. There is no reason to beat myself up; I’ll just take it one day at a time.’ Now you can rethink your previous decision and take action that will move you forward towards more positive change.

As you begin to understand your reasons for negative self­ talk, you’ll find yourself recognizing it more and more quickly after it occurs. Eventually, as you practice, you’ll be able to recognize and stop negative self-talk before it interferes with your decisions.

It is very important to practice positive thinking and to remind yourself that you’re a worthwhile person whatever you do. Try to consistently acknowledge that you are making positive changes to improve your health. You should be proud of yourself. Visualize yourself as capable, happy, and confident. These positive feelings will help the process of change. Remember, there are bound to be times when you’re feeling frustrated or depressed. Positive thinkers know that these feelings are valid, and they don’t try to ignore them. Positive thinkers acknowledge and try to understand them, but they don’t blame themselves for the conditions that lead to these feelings. Good luck, stay positive, and enjoy all the wonderful benefits of a healthy lifestyle!

article from www.bodybuilding-workouts.org

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Ann Arbor Featured Client for Sept 2010

Thursday, September 2nd, 2010

Post by: Kelly Kalbfleisch, NPTI Trainer

Manager of Ann Arbor CMF

I want to take more time to give proper recognition to those clients, here in Ann Arbor, who have met or are on their way to meeting their goals.  One in particular, David Fry, shared his story with me this month.  David is the perfect example of how dedication and the proper mind set will allow anyone to reach his/her goals.  Be inspired by his story, as I was. 

BEFORE:

I grew up in Pennsylvania in a family of overweight people. There was no appreciation for eating right or getting regular exercise. But even among my loved ones I stood out. I was an obese child who became a morbidly obese teenager, carrying 350 pounds on my 5′ 7″ frame by the time I entered college. My weight defined my life.

After my freshman year I put myself on a starvation diet of my own design. By eating less than 500 calories a day I lost more than 150 pounds in six months. This was an extremely stupid thing to do and some of my internal organs turned against me. But I was young and ultimately regained my health. I was thrilled with my new body and I lived the life I had always been denied. I was physically active throughout my 20s and kept my weight off with no particular effort.

In the mid 1990s I moved to Ann Arbor with my wife and started a new business. I resumed my bad eating habits and sedentary lifestyle as I focused on my work, and I started regaining my weight rapidly. But I kept telling myself, “It’s okay, I’ve lost weight before. I can lose it again when I need to.” Somehow I just never got around to it. Ten years later I finally had to deal with the consequences when a bout of severe dizziness and confusion led me to a local hospital. I weighed over 400 pounds and had extremely high blood pressure, with a host of other medical problems around the corner.

That scared me enough that I finally started to address my problem. Over the next few years I slowly lost 60 pounds by eating a little better and getting more physical activity. I didn’t really make progress, though, until my wife and I joined Coach Me Fit and began working out with Ann Marie Furlong. Even when I was young and active I never had done any structured weight training, so Ann Marie’s workouts were a new experience for me. I remember being so exhausted in the first few months that several times I drove home and fell asleep in the car in my garage before going inside the house. Ann Marie was the perfect coach for me. She challenged me to push harder each time, but she didn’t come on strong with a “drill sergeant” attitude. Some people respond well to that but it probably would have been counterproductive with me. I think a good personality match with your trainer is very important.

Over the next two years my physical fitness and stamina improved greatly but I only lost about 20 pounds because I still wasn’t watching my calorie intake. I used to joke that if they had an Olympics for people with a BMI over 50, I would do very well! Good health truly is about “fitness” and not just “weight loss,” but I still had face the facts about my diet. Late last year I signed up for a service called BistroMD that delivers frozen, pre-packaged meals to my home once a week. Starting right before Thanksgiving (great timing, right?) I began eating 1,200 to 1,400 calories per day while continuing my regular Coach Me Fit workouts. I also started using an iPhone app called “Tap N Track” to measure all the calories I ate or burned up through exercise each day.

The results were immediate. I lost 25 pounds through the holiday season, which encouraged me to stick to my diet. And the weight loss made it easier for me to workout so I was able to increase my physical activity throughout the winter. Ann Marie started giving me more challenging workouts at Coach Me Fit, and in the spring I rediscovered my old love of long distance road cycling, something I hadn’t done in more than 15 years.

Today I’m happy to report I’ve lost 100 pounds since November 2009. I’ve dropped eight clothing sizes, I’m no longer taking blood pressure medicine, and my cholesterol level is now well within the healthy range. But more than that, I can barely describe how much better I feel every day, whether I’m rushing through a crowded airport with heavy luggage, riding my bike to Brighton and back, or simply trying to fit into a seat at the movie theater. Obesity means making compromises with yourself every day, and I finally decided I didn’t want to do it anymore.

I know my struggle isn’t over. I still want to lose another 40 pounds or so but, even after that, good health is a lifelong commitment to smart food choices and regular physical activity. Coach Me Fit will continue to be a part of that for me.

I have two pieces of advice for anyone who’s facing similar challenges: First, don’t wait to get started on a healthy lifestyle.   As I learned, time is not your friend. Each week it just gets harder and harder to change bad habits, and you just find yourself farther and farther away from where you need to be. As they say, “when you find yourself stuck in a hole, the first thing to do is stop digging.”

Second, you don’t have to solve all your problems at once. Do you what you can, when you can. Each step forward is progress. You can see in my history that I rapidly lost a huge amount of weight when I was young, but I did it in an unhealthy way that didn’t really include a conscious change to my lifestyle. And so my weight rapidly returned. My current weight loss adventure has actually been multi-phased, lasting over five years. The people around me have noticed the big physical change in the last 10 months, but my brain started making the necessary adjustments several years ago.

If you’re reading this, that probably means you’re a Coach Me Fit client or thinking about becoming one. So then “Congratulations” on a great first step towards a healthier life!

AFTER:

Thank you for sharing your story, David.  Congratulations on all your progress.  I’m excited to see you reach more goals as you continue on this healthy living journey!!

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Weekly Update 2 and 3

Monday, January 26th, 2009

“Biggest Loser” contestant Joelle Gwynn is a client at the CoachMeFit studio in West Bloomfield,  MI.  She works out with the owner of the studio, Catherine Munaco.

“Biggest Loser” airs Tuesday’s at 8:00pm on NBC.\

Catherine will be blogging weekly first-hand updates from Joelle’s training

(Oops!  Week 2 must have been busy!)

These past two weeks were difficult emotionally on Joelle. Week 2 and 3 aired episodes that portrayed Joelle as a slacker. It seemed that the cast’s attitude towards Joelle was less than cordial. Furthermore, Joelle was in the bottom two during the weigh-ins two weeks in a row. Joelle said this was the most difficult time on the ranch for her—Carla was putting a lot of pressure on her and so were her teammates. While this may motivate some people, it’s certainly not how Joelle is motivated. Because she is naturally quiet and not competitive, it actually defeated her more than it helped. It was initially hard to figure out what would motivate Joelle, but the more we trained together, the more I realized Joelle was motivated by positive feedback. What she really needed was a buddy (enter, Catherine!). While I feel it’s my primary job to give Joelle a tough, physically demanding workout, I also feel like she needs someone on her team. These past two weeks, we’ve tried to surround her with as much support as possible. Last Wednesday, after watching another difficult episode air the night before, she came in and said “I’m done worrying about the show. I want to focus on me.” SUCCESS! Let’s get rockin’

This week, Joelle and I also finalized a schedule for her workouts from now until the May 12 finale. We coordinated fitness class schedule with my availability and Joelle’s work schedule. When all was said and done, Joelle is working out a minimum of four hours a day, including multiple kickboxing classes, cardio interval workouts, and strength training sessions with me. We did allow Sunday to be a lighter day, so she could recuperate and prevent injury. Four hours a day is a lot for anyone, but it’s especially dense for someone who didn’t work out before starting at the ranch. Psychologically, Joelle mentioned having some difficulty getting her head around the idea of being skinny. Our schedule and workout plan put her on track to lose over 160 pounds since her initial ranch weigh in! That’s a lot of weight in a short amount of time. Even more noteworthy is that the last time she weighed less than 200 pounds was when she was ten years old. Joelle has literally never been thin—and the thought of success may take some getting used to. In the meantime, I’m keeping her on track and the weight is really starting to come off. Since starting at CoachMeFit, Joelle is losing weight at the same rate that she did while on the ranch. This is extremely encouraging. On the ranch, there is no job, no family, and few similarities to real life. It is infinitely more difficult to lose weight at home, where the demands of life can easily take precedence over working out. In this regard, Joelle seems most appreciative to have a trainer to keep her on track and motivated, although she has been teasing me about the phrases I use most as a trainer. She took a particular liking to my personal favorite, “Its only numbers”. I say it when we have 5 reps left and she’s hurting. Joelle said it puts things in perspective—only numbers! But I do use it a lot. I’ll have to scour the internet for some new motivating phrases.

As always, stay tuned…

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Amy’s Hardwork Paying Off

Wednesday, November 5th, 2008

“Biggest Loser” contestants Amy and Shellay are clients at the CoachMeFit studio in Birmingham, MI.  They work out with the Owners of the studio, Derek and Kerrie DiGiovanni.

“Biggest Loser” airs Tuesday’s at 8:00pm on NBC.

“The energy goes right out of me when I don’t exercise. That’s a real eye-opener,” Shellay observed after a family funeral and other obligations made it impossible to keep up her intense exercise regimen this past week. Contrary to how she might have expected to feel after dramatically cutting down on exercise, Shellay admits she “felt exhausted.”

Amy’s hard work is really paying off. When Biggest Loser last aired two weeks ago, she ranked number one – she had lost the greatest percentage of body fat of any of the contestants. From Shellay’s perspective, this has made as big a change in her attitude as in her body. “She is so much happier now.”

Shellay has mentioned before that she tried all kinds of diets from the time she was a teenager. It wasn’t until Biggest Loser that she realized the role of exercise in losing weight. If you doubt the extremes to which she went to lose weight, check this out — Shellay, her mom, aunt, and cousin all tried a controversial diet that involved receiving injections of animal placenta. Imagine that even as a teenager, Shellay was desperately searching for a way to lose weight, just like her mom.

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The Biggest Loser

Monday, September 29th, 2008

This is the first of weekly updates on CoachMeFit’s celebrity clients, Biggest Loser contestants Shellay and Amy Cremen. The mother-daughter duo has been training at CoachMeFit Birmingham with owner/trainer Derek DiGiovanni since the summer. At stake is a $250,000 prize for losing the most weight by the season finale in mid December. The Biggest Loser airs every Tuesday at 8pm on NBC.The Biggest Loser at CoachMeFit

“I can feel my ribs!” exclaimed Shellay, noting one of the many ways her body is changing as she sheds more pounds each week. Shellay admits that until entering this competition she wasn’t able to maintain a diet or exercise program. She explained, “Not being able to keep commitments to ourselves and lack of self-discipline run in my family. But, I’m very good at keeping commitments to others.” Shellay thinks that’s a big reason why she can stick with her demanding, life-changing workout schedule. She’s made commitments to her teammate, her daughter Amy; to her husband who walks miles with her every night; and to Derek, her CoachMeFit trainer. Scheduling appointments 3 times a week are like making promises. Being accountable for her progress means working hard during each session.

Derek developed a fitness plan to meet Shellay’s goals. Her sessions are a combination of cardio and weight training. “When I have been able to diet and lose some weight, I just looked thinner. Now I can see how toning improves my shape.” In between CoachMeFit training, she works out on her own and adds a long walk every night.

“I haven’t been discouraged because I’ve continue to lose weight and see results,” says Shellay. “My whole mental attitude is different. I’ve stopped sabotaging myself and am convinced that I can do this. The benefits so outweigh the effort.”

For more about the competition read Birmingham’s CoachMeFit trains ‘Biggest Loser’ contestants.

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Down Economy? I say the glass is half full.

Wednesday, August 6th, 2008

a Personal Trainer at Work

I’ve heard a lot of talk about the struggling U.S. economy as of late. Although this talk is spread across the entire country, it seems to be particularly prevalent in the state of Michigan where the CoachMeFit Franchise Corporation is based and where four CoachMeFit Private Personal Training studios exist.

The way I see it, there are two ways to deal with a down economy:

1) jump on the negative talk band wagon, plug along with whatever it is you’re doing, and hope that the economy will some day turn around

OR

2) treat the “down economy” as an opportunity to make things happen

The reality with a down economy is that it’s all about the attitude one has towards it. The majority of the population adopts option #1 above and never moves forward with a plan to create financial security and control.

A small percentage of the population adopt option #2 above and take the “bull by the horns”. These people typically have a better quality of life and are financially sound.

From a business standpoint, CoachMeFit studios are doing better than ever and we’re expanding our personal training studio concept across the Midwest despite many around us saying that we’re headed toward a recession. Why? Because there is a tremendous amount of opportunity out there right now. Landlord’s are desperate to fill their vacant buildings and are therefore willing to make concessions for tenants, building contractors are slashing their labor prices in order to remain competitive with one another for the jobs that are out there, and banks are willing to lend money at an all time low rate to those with good credit and a good business model. In addition, many people are running out of health a lot faster than wealth and CoachMeFit can actually help them.

If you’re currently a Personal Trainer and have thought about starting your own Personal Training business, but are hesitant to make the jump from employee to business owner because of what you read in the media about the economy, think again. The media statistics you should be focusing on are the ones that talk about the obesity epidemic and rising health care costs due to lack of physical activity. More than ever there is a need for Personal Trainers and Personal Training studios.

If you’re ready to capitalize on your dream of owning your own Personal Training studio, check out our website to learn more about us. We’re looking for the right people to join our team and to share in the vision of creating the highest quality personal training program worldwide.

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