Archive for the ‘Fitness Business’ Category

Flip the Switch

Monday, May 14th, 2012
Kelly Kalbfleisch, NPTI Certified Personal Trainer
Manager of CoachMeFit Ann Arbor

We all get bored with our workout routine once in awhile.  A lot of people don’t switch it up because they aren’t sure what other options they have.  Listed below is a way to “Flip the switch on routine boredom”.

“I have to honest with you, there are days when I’m getting ready for the gym and I’m just not feeling it at all.  This happened the other day, and not a single cell in my body wanted to be surrounded by the same old cardio machines and weights.  So I asked myself, “what would make me happy?”  I love Zumba.  So instead of dragging myself halfheartedly through my regular workout, I popped in a Zumba DVD and danced my heart out.  Not only did I have a blast, but I was dripping with sweat afterwards and burned almost 600 calories!

All too often, we get caught up in the same old routine.  When our excitement for a workout goes down, so does the intensity- that’s when results come to a screeching halt.  For a well-rounded physique and to keep things fresh, incorporate what makes you happy into your workout.”

If you always:

1. Run 5K on the Treadmill:

Hit the park or pavement for some outdoor interval training.  Use landmarks such as streetlights, trees or hills as markers for your sprints.

2. Strength train, then do cardio:

Combine the two with a heart-pounding plyometric routine!  You don’t need anything but an open space and a lot of energy to do burpees, pop squats, mountain climbers or jumping jacks.

3.  Kill an hour on the bike:

Take a spin class!  The intervals and motivating instructor will help you burn way more calories – no distracting TVs!

4.  Do the same ol’ weight routine:

Make a circuit using your favorite moves to elevate your heart rate and save tons of time.

Article by: Miryah Scott-Oxygen Magazine

 

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Earn It!

Tuesday, April 24th, 2012
 
Kelly Kalbfleisch, NPTI Certified Personal Trainer
Manager of CoachMeFit Ann Arbor
 

 

This message stood out to me this week because I’ve been having a pity party about not looking the way I want to look.  I don’t WANT to eat right and I don’t WANT to stay on a regular exercise routine. Basically, I’m saying I don’t want to EARN this body.  How pathetic and lazy!

So often we focus on the things we don’t like, or even hate, about our body and wish we could change them. Guess what?!?!  We can.  It takes work, but we can achieve what we focus on.  If you need help, seek it out and stop sitting around having a pity party.  Earn your body and health.  It is worth it and it will make you proud!!

 

 

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Stretching: Focus on Flexibility

Wednesday, March 28th, 2012
 
 
Kelly Kalbfleisch, NPTI Certified Personal Trainer
Manager of CoachMeFit Ann Arbor
 

 

A lot of my clients, and other people in general, complain about stiff muscles.  My first question to them is, “are you stretching”. The answer is typically no.  Most people, myself included, think of stretching as chore. I’m not sure why!  I know the benefits of sticking to a regular stretching routine outweigh the negative effects of not stretching.  We all just need to make it a part of our daily routine.

You can stretch anytime, anywhere. Just follow these tips to do it safely and effectively.

By Mayo Clinic staff

Stretching may take a back seat to your exercise routine. You may think that stretching your hamstrings and calves is just something to be done if you have a few extra minutes before or after pounding out some miles on the treadmill. The main concern is exercising, not stretching, right?

Not so fast. Although studies about the benefits of stretching are mixed, stretching may help you improve your flexibility, which in turn may improve your athletic performance and decrease your risk of injury. Understand why stretching can help — and how to stretch correctly.

Benefits of stretching

Studies about the benefits of stretching have had mixed results. Some show that stretching helps, while others show that stretching has little if any benefit. The main benefits of stretching are thought to be:

  • Improving athletic performance
  • Decreasing the risk of activity-based injuries

Stretching can help improve flexibility. And better flexibility may improve your performance in physical activities or decrease your risk of injuries by helping your joints move through their full range of motion. For instance, say your Achilles tendon is tight and lacks flexibility. If you do a lot of hill walking, your foot may not move through its full range of motion. Over time, this can increase your risk of tendinitis or tendinopathy in your Achilles tendon. Stretching your Achilles tendon, though, may improve the range of motion in your ankle. This, in turn, can decrease the risk of microtrauma to your tendon that can lead to overload and injury.

Stretching also increases blood flow to the muscle. And you may come to enjoy the ritual of stretching before — or better yet, after — hitting the trail, ballet floor or soccer field.

Stretching essentials

Before you plunge into stretching, make sure you do it safely and effectively. While you can stretch anytime, anywhere — in your home, at work, in a hotel room or at the park — you want to be sure to use proper technique. Stretching incorrectly can actually do more harm than good.

Use these tips to keep stretching safe:

  • Don’t consider stretching a warm-up. You may hurt yourself if you stretch cold muscles. So before stretching, warm up with light walking, jogging or biking at low intensity for five to 10 minutes. Or better yet, stretch after you exercise when your muscles are warmed up. Also, consider holding off on stretching before an intense activity, such as sprinting or track and field activities. Some research suggests that pre-event stretching before these types of events may actually decrease performance.
  • Focus on major muscle groups. When you’re stretching, focus on your calves, thighs, hips, lower back, neck and shoulders. Also stretch muscles and joints that you routinely use at work or play. And make sure that you stretch both sides. For instance, if you stretch your left hamstring, be sure to stretch your right hamstring, too.
  • Don’t bounce. Bouncing as you stretch can cause small tears in the muscle. These tears leave scar tissue as the muscle heals, which tightens the muscle even further, making you less flexible and more prone to pain. So, hold each stretch for about 30 seconds. Repeat each stretch three or four times.
  • Don’t aim for pain. Expect to feel tension while you’re stretching, not pain. If it hurts, you’ve pushed too far. Back off to the point where you don’t feel any pain, then hold the stretch.
  • Make stretches sport specific. Some evidence suggests that it’s helpful to do stretches tailored for your sport or activity. If you play soccer, for instance, you’re more vulnerable to hamstring strains. So opt for stretches that help your hamstrings.
  • Keep up with your stretching. Stretching can be time-consuming. But you can achieve the best benefits by stretching regularly, at least two to three times a week. If you don’t stretch regularly, you risk losing any benefits that stretching offered. For instance, if stretching helped you increase your range of motion, and you stop stretching, your range of motion may decrease again.
  • Bring movement into your stretching. Gentle movement can help you be more flexible in specific movements. The gentle movements of tai chi, for instance, may be a good way to stretch. And if you’re going to perform a specific activity, such as a front kick in martial arts, do the move slowly and at low intensity at first to get your muscles used to it. Then speed up gradually as your muscles become accustomed to the motion.

Know when to exercise caution

In some cases, you may need to approach stretching with caution. If you have a chronic condition or an injury, you may need to adjust your stretching techniques. For example, if you already have a strained muscle, stretching it may cause further harm.

Also, don’t think that because you stretch you can’t get injured. Stretching, for instance, won’t prevent an overuse injury. Talk to your doctor or physical therapist about the best way to stretch if you have any health concerns.

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10 WAYS TO BOOST YOUR METABOLISM

Monday, February 13th, 2012
 
 Kelly Kalbfleisch, NPTI Certified Personal Trainer
Manager of CoachMeFit Ann Arbor

Many of my clients struggle to lose weight, especially those who are middle aged and older.  This week I want to focus on metabolism.  If you’ve never tried to boost your metabolism, I challenge you to do so by making some changes to your diet, exercise routine and overall lifestyle.  It’s amazing how good you will feel when your metabolism changes.

 

Your metabolism is responsible for converting food and drink into energy, according to the National Institutes of Health. Your age, gender and body size all contribute to your unique basal metabolic rate ( BMR). Your BMR is the minimum number of calories your body needs to sustain life while it’s in a resting state. This rate accounts for well over 50 percent of the calories you burn each day. A few alterations in diet and lifestyle may help boost your metabolism.

Aerobic Exercise

You can give your metabolism a boost by performing physical activity for at least 30 minutes most days of the week. Aerobic exercise such as jogging, brisk walking and swimming can increase the number of calories your burn and help to prevent weight gain

Keep Moving

Adopting active hobbies and habits can also contribute to a speedier metabolism. Activities such as gardening, climbing the stairs instead of taking the elevator, standing up while using the phone and parking farther away from the entrances to buildings are simple changes you can make throughout your day to enhance your metabolism.

Lift Weights

Resistance training is another good way to jump start a sluggish metabolism. Using free weights or a weight machine two to four times a week for 20 minutes can increase your resting metabolic rate for several hours after your workout. Keep in mind that muscles burn more calories than fat while at rest.

Say Yes To Breakfast

Eating breakfast helps enhance your metabolism at the start of each new day. Your metabolic rate slows overnight after being deprived of food for several hours. Your cells need to be replenished with nutrients or they will adapt to surviving on less by storing fat in anticipation of future deprivation.

Don’t Starve Yourself

Breakfast isn’t the only meal that is important for a healthy metabolism. Your metabolism works best when you eat several small meals each day. Eating small amounts every two to four hours throughout the day helps regulate your blood and encourage your metabolism to work at a higher rate. When you skip meals, your metabolic thermostat stops working in order to conserve its remaining energy.

Eat Healthy Foods

Eating a nutritious diet that includes plenty of fiber and limited amounts of sugar can help improve your metabolism. Good food choices include whole grains, fish, dark green leafy vegetables, blueberries and tomatoes.

Say No to Sugar

When you eat sugar, you throw your metabolic switch into fat storage mode. High blood sugar levels then lead to increased levels of insulin, our body’s signal to store unused energy as fat.

Spice Things Up

Certain spicy foods, like chili, may raise your metabolic rate. You might want to consider adding a few hot peppers or jalapenos to your meals.

Drink Water

Drinking at least eight, eight-ounce glasses of water every day can contribute to a higher metabolism. Prevention.com says cool water works best because your body burns more calories by working to warm the water to your body temperature.

Get Enough Sleep

When you don’t get enough sleep, you may feel hungry even when you’re full. Sleep deprivation can lead to overeating, which compromises your body’s ability to sufficiently metabolize carbohydrates. This can result in weight gain and make weight loss more challenging. Most adults need between seven and nine hours of sleep every night, according to True Star Health.com.

Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/104922-boost-metabolism/#ixzz1lvxvpojJ  

You will not regret making these changes.  Your body is a wonderful masterpiece and having control over changing it, is one of the most powerful gifts you will ever receive.

 

 

 

 

 

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Sugar and Weight Gain

Wednesday, November 23rd, 2011
 
Kelly Kalbfleisch, NPTI Certified Personal Trainer
Manager of CoachMeFit Ann Arbor

 

I am angry, angry at sugar! 

Due to an injury, I have been very limited in my workouts for about 11 weeks now.  Being a trainer, I know that when something like this happens, it is imperative that my diet be as flawless as possible (which is extremely hard for a girl who loves to eat).  This is where my hatred of sugar comes into play.

I dislike yogurt, but I thought I would give it another shot (for about the 50th time).  I found a few flavors that looked like they may taste ok.  First one was great.  Second one was great as well.  I started thinking something must be wrong with this yogurt if I actually like it.  For some reason, I didn’t bother to turn this little yummy of cup of goodness around to view the nutrition facts, which I typically do before I purchase any food.  It’s low fat = great. It’s low calorie = great.  Then I see it and mid bite I throw the half eaten yogurt in the trash.  Out of the 25 grams of Carbohydrates 22 grams of them are SUGAR!  WHAT?!?!  I could not believe it.  Well, actually, I could have believed it if I would have been thinking straight.  I blame it on the lack of exercise :)  

This led me to start thinking about all my clients who are struggling with their diet and weight loss.  Low fat and low calorie does not mean the product is good for you.  I found a great article that explains what sugar does in the body and why it causes people to gain weight. 

“Isn’t she sweet?” “Rose are Red, Violets are Blue, Sugar is sweet and so are You.” “Visions of sugar plums danced in their head.” “Come on over here, Sugar.” It is everywhere. Sugar, which used to be a rare treat, is in almost every home today. It has woven its way into the fabric of our society. Grandma’s cookies, birthday cakes, Christmas candy, Valentine’s chocolates, the pies and pastries at every celebration feast. Sugar is everywhere.

So, if it is that prominent it can’t be that bad can it? Well, look at the rise in popularity, and availability, of sugar and you will see a similar rise in obesity rates. The research is still out on the different types of naturally occurring sugars and all of the sugar alcohols and artificial sweeteners, so we will focus on refined sugar. This includes white, cane sugar and brown sugar.

First, let’s take a look at what sugar does. Glucose is used by the body for energy. The muscles and organs use it to supply the energy they need to perform their regular functions. In order for the glucose to get to the cells that need it there needs to be a transporter. This is where insulin comes in. It transports the glucose to the cells with the open receptors. Once all receptor sites in the brain, other organs, and muscles are closed the insulin then takes the glucose to storage sites (fat stores.) Most foods can be broken down into glucose for energy but it takes time through the digestive process.

Refined sugar is rapidly converted to glucose in the body. That is why you get a buzz or sugar “high” right after you eat sugar. The problem is that because there is so much sugar in the system after a sugary snack the body cannot utilize all of the glucose so the body releases more insulin to rapidly get the glucose out of the system. The easiest way for the body to do that is to shuffle the excess into fat stores quickly. Then you crash. The body now wants the extra energy, but the energy has been stored away so your energy levels drop to the floor.

So, as you can see the influx of sugar causes the body to quickly take all of the excess energy flowing through the blood stream and put it in fat stores. Not a positive situation for a dieter. Since they are trying to lose fat, not gain it.

So, it’s easy then, just don’t add sugar to my foods and drinks, right? That is only a small piece of it. While this will help, it is not the complete solution. Sugar is hidden in many of our foods. One place people are surprised to find so much sugar is in the low-fat and no-fat foods. To make up for the taste lost by eliminating the fat, food manufacturers dump in extra sugar. A fat free cake may have almost twice as much sugar as the regular alternative. Drinks are another area of concern. Look at soft drinks, they are almost completely sugar, with almost 65 grams of sugar in a bottle.

Sugar can quickly sabotage fat loss efforts, but it may not be as simple as throwing out the sugar bowl. Reading labels is important. Food companies seldom list “sugar” in the ingredients. It will usually be sucrose, dextrose, or some other “-ose” item. Looking at the nutrient breakdown will be a good indicator. Under carbohydrates, companies now have to show sugar and fiber content. If a food has 15 grams of carbohydrates per serving and 12 of those are sugar you might want to find another choice. Don’t let these little white granules destroy your diet. Read labels carefully, avoid extra sugar, and eat a mix of nutrients during your meals for a more even blood sugar level.

article By Jennifer Olsen

My advice: READ LABELS…..always!!

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Plan Ahead to Prepare Your Meals!

Wednesday, October 5th, 2011

Kelly Kalbfleisch, NPTI Certified Personal Trainer

Manager of CoachMeFit Ann Arbor


What do you eat for breakfast and lunch?  Are you eating on the fly or feel you have no time for lunch?  I’m a firm believer, and I do this myself, in preparing meals for breakfast and lunch on one particular day during the week.  This way, I have everything in the fridge ready for me to grab to take to work.  I’ve fallen victim to the “I didn’t have time to eat” or “I have to eat whatever is fast” excuses.  I am now prepared and even if I only have 10 minutes to eat, I have healthy food instead of take-out.  I found this article that has really good tips to help you get focused and prepared.

“You wouldn’t start your day, go on vacation, or show up to a job interview without a plan, right? So think of meal prep and packing your cooler as your plan for a healthy body.  Your biggest obstacle is going to be managing your time so that getting fit and healthy doesn’t compete with the rest of your commitments.  Prioritizing and planning ahead will actually make life easier and help facilitate your success in the long term.  While it may seem trivial and even stressful at times, preparedness is one of the most important elements of a healthy lifestyle.  Having everything packed and ready to go will be less stressful than leaving your meal choices up to chance and heading to whatever take-out joint is nearby at mealtime.

Try these tips:

1.       Schedule some prep time: A lot of people (including myself) use Sundays as our shop and prep day.  Pick a day when you have a few free hours to buy and prepare your food for the week.

2.       Pack Cook-Free Snacks: Toss these items into your bag for effortless re energizing:

Raw almonds

Protein Powder

Low-fat String Cheese

Chopped Veggies

Fruit

Ezekiel Bread

Hummus

3.       Get yourself a cooler: Invest in a good, manageable-sized cooler (12-can size or larger) for storing your meals and snacks.  Pack it the night before and store in the fridge so you can grab it and go.

4.       Don’t forget your Gym Bag: Being prepared doesn’t stop with meals.  Pack your gym clothes and sneakers the night before, not as you’re flying out the door.”

-Oxygen Magazine

Engrave this word into your brain:  PREPARE

If you need more tips on what foods to prepare and/or pack, ask your trainer!

 

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5 Ways to Jumpstart Your Fat Loss

Tuesday, August 2nd, 2011
Kelly Kalbfleisch, NPTI Certified Personal Trainer
Manager of CoachMeFit Ann Arbor

Fall is fast approaching.  If you’ve had a little too much enjoyment in terms of BBQ and beverages this summer you may need a kick start for the fall.  Here are a few tips to get you back on track.  Set some goals and burn some of that unwanted and unhealthy fat!!

1. Count your steps

Not literally, of course, but by using a pedometer and recording how many steps you take each day. According to The Cooper Institute for Aerobic Research, 10,000 steps a day will get you started on the path to fat loss and cardiovascular health. Some good ways to add to your count? Take the stairs; ditch the email and walk over to the person sitting down the hall instead; or walk with a buddy at lunch.

2. Eat more

You’ve heard it before and we’ll say it again: plan to eat six small meals throughout your day to control your caloric intake. You’ll give your body more fuel to tackle those 10,000 steps!

3. Sleep more

Ok, cut out on the late night talk-show circuit tonight and hit the sack! Studies reveal that two hormones are responsible for your need to feed: ghrelin and leptin. Ghrelin tells your body it’s hungry, while leptin tells your body it’s full. When you don’t sleep, ghrelin thrives and so will your appetite, so tonight be sure to get your vitamin “zzzz.”

4. Lift weights

The healthier your muscles are the more they will aid in your showdown against fat. Weight training boosts your metabolism and that, in turn, will melt fat and keep your body incinerating all day.

5. Fiber + protein = fat loss

This twosome helps cut cravings by keeping you satisfied longer by breaking down food at a slower rate in your body. Before the day is through, whip up a protein shake, steam some leafy green veggies or pack dried fruit for your afternoon snack. Whatever it is, just make a point of doing it!

 Article from Oxygenmag.com

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Staying Accountable with Calorie Tracking Tools

Monday, July 18th, 2011

When it comes to leading a healthy lifestyle, information is power.  The more in tune one is with their body, the better he or she can fine-tune their routine to optimize their health.  One great way to stay in touch with your body is to keep a food log to track the amount of calories you intake every day.  If you know how much you are taking in, you can adjust your intake or your fitness routine to meet your fitness goals.

 

The web offers many great solutions for easy calorie tracking and one particularly good option is Livestrong.com’s MyPlate feature.  Creating a basic account is free, and once you are signed up, tracking calories is easy using their comprehensive database of common food items with all of the nutritional information already entered.  MyPlate also offers a long list of activities so that you can closely track the calories you burn compared to your intake.

 

Of course, what would a calorie-tracking tool be if it were not easily portable?  Luckily, Livestrong offers a $2.99 mobile app that syncs to your account so you can keep your log up-to-date on the go.

 

The Livestrong solution is just one of many excellent tools available to keep good records of your food intake and daily activities in order to develop a broader picture of your real health and fitness level.

 

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Personal Training 101

Tuesday, June 14th, 2011

Most people at some point or another have found themselves lacking the motivation to follow through on a fitness routine by themselves.  If you find yourself losing focus on a solo fitness regimen, a great option is to work with a personal trainer.  This article from LiveStrong.com highlights the numerous potential benefits of working out with a personal trainer.

Personal Training 101

Find the Right Fit and Create Your Own Finish Line

By DeborahB

A good personal trainer can help you get slimmer and stronger just as quickly as a bad one can lighten your wallet and leave you limping along the side of the road. A well-trained fitness coach will know how to guide your strength and conditioning goals while keeping you off the injured reserve list.

Credentials First, Please

Check for credentials. Anyone can call himself a personal trainer; however, educational programs are available for trainers, each requiring varying coursework, workshops, testing and costs. Investing time and money in professional credentials is, if nothing else, an indication that the personal trainer is serious about his career.

Employment for fitness workers is expected to increase much faster than the average for all occupations, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. To set standards for this growth and protect customers, the National Commission for Certifying Agencies (NCCA) accredits certification programs in the fitness industry. Check that your personal trainer has a certification from an organization accredited by the NCCA; it’s considered highly desirable.

Once you determine your prospective trainer’s credentials, think about how her education might help you achieve your goals. Do you want to lose 10 lbs. by swimsuit season, run a 10K, or simply feel better on a daily basis and improve longevity? Celebrity trainer Jamie Milnes said, “People come to me for three main reasons: to look better, to improve their health and to perform better.” Milnes has trained a host of celebrities, including Harrison Ford, Natasha Bedingfield and Cindy Crawford. He believes it’s easier to stay motivated when your long-term goals are related to health, as opposed to aesthetics.

Ask about your trainer’s current clientele. If you’re a 45-year-old woman, but your trainer usually works with 20-something gym rats, it might not be a match made in bodybuilding heaven. Ideally, you want a trainer who relates to your particular fitness level. If you have injuries or chronic health problems, that’s even more important. As Milnes explained, “Anyone can go out and beat you up. A good trainer knows how to make adjustments based on your age, health and any special health conditions.”

All About Qualities

Is your trainer the strong, silent type or a no-holds-barred drill sergeant? A trainer’s means of motivating is a significant consideration. Certain styles will keep you pumped up, while others will give you a headache. The only way to know for sure is to go through an actual training session. Many trainers will give you the first session free. Just ask.

Observe your trainer candidate in his natural habitat: the gym. Does your trainer surround himself with a quality entourage? Ideally, your trainer’s inner circle should be composed — in part — of medical professionals. Good trainers have longstanding relationships with competent professionals who know sports medicine, physical therapy and nutrition.

More doctors are prescribing fitness as the best medicine and are actively seeking out trainers as referral partners. Your family doctor might have a great trainer in mind for you.

Don’t overlook likeability. You’re going to be sweating it out with your trainer at least twice a week in most cases. You’ll need to share personal information about your health and wellness. At the very least, you should enjoy this person’s company.

Reaching Results

A standardized fitness assessment from the Mayo Clinic based on a program designed by the President’s Council on Physical Fitness and Sports looks at four key areas: aerobic fitness, muscular fitness, flexibility and body composition. Keep these in mind when you communicate your goals. Your trainer should start with an overall assessment of your health, including a body-fat analysis. Talk candidly with your trainer about what you hope to accomplish, and be ready to accept frank feedback. “If you commit to at least two days a week, you’ll see results in the first month,” said Jennifer Kenny, a Denver-based personal trainer. Then, be patient. Super bodies don’t evolve overnight, even for the camera-ready Hollywood types.

“One of the biggest reasons people drop out from a training program is the unrealistic expectation that weight training is a silver bullet,” said Kenny. You should look at it as one component in an overall plan for good health. Eating right, other forms of exercise and overall balance should also be part of the mix. “You can’t expect to hit the gym a couple of times a week, eat whatever you want and still meet your goals,” Kenny said. Sporadic exercise of any kind seldom yields results.

A good trainer will continually mix up your routine and come up with new and creative ways to help you stay motivated. Don’t be shy about suggesting something you’d like to try.

Remember, throwing money at someone to help you sculpt a better body won’t replace hard work and dedication. Half the battle is finding the right person up front, before you ever break a sweat. “Working with a personal trainer should be a great experience,” said Milnes. In the end, most trainers and experts agree: Major results boil down to the client’s determination and readiness to incorporate fitness into a healthy lifestyle — for the long haul.
Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/300140-personal-training-101/#ixzz1PGuZj9rk

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Shrimp Pesto Pasta

Wednesday, April 27th, 2011

Kelly Kalbfleisch, NPTI Certified Personal Trainer
Manager of CoachMeFit Ann Arbor

This week I wanted to share one of my favorite recipes with you.  Enjoy!!

Ingredients:

 4 oz Barilla Plus penne pasta

12–14 medium-size precooked, peeled shrimp

 3 c chopped baby spinach

1 tomato, chopped

3 Tbsp ready-made pesto OR  pesto dry mix and add water and oil.

3 Tbsp crumbled Gorgonzola cheese

2 Tbsp diced walnuts

How to Make it:

1.  Boil the pasta according to the package directions. 

2.  If you’re using frozen shrimp, defrost them by running warm water over them.

3.  Drain the pasta.

4.  Transfer the pasta to a large bowl and add the remaining ingredients, stirring well to help wilt the spinach and mix in the pesto. Makes 2 servings

 

EXTRA CREDIT

Eat with mixed greens and two or three slices of raw tomato, sprinkled lightly with salt and drizzled with some balsamic vinaigrette.

 

Per Serving (Including salad):  490 calories, 27 grams (g) protein, 47 g carbohydrates, 22 g fat (6 g saturated), 8 g fiber, 515 milligrams sodium

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