Archive for the ‘Weight Loss’ Category

PEP TALK

Wednesday, March 30th, 2011
Kelly Kalbfleisch, NPTI Certified Personal Trainer
Manager of CoachMeFit Ann Arbor

 

This month a few of my clients have been experiencing negativity with exercise, their progress, outside comments, eating etc…. We all go through it!  Yes, even me.  I thought this week we could all use a little pep talk about how to get through these negative times. 

Negative self-talk is a destructive habit and part of an essential defense mechanism that we often develop to protect ourselves. Many people end up talking themselves out of actions that may be scary or uncomfortable. ‘I can’t do this’ is really just a way of saying ‘I don’t want to deal with the experience of doing this.’ We are all strongly influenced by our feelings, often determining how and what action we ultimately take. If the feeling is uncomfortable, negative self-talk results; then we often decide not to take any action at all.

Many people assume that if a past experience produced a certain result, there is nothing they can do to change that experience in order to produce a different result. ‘I’ve tried every diet there is. I know what I should do; I just can’t do it.’

Please understand that you make the choice not to repeat old patterns of eating, non-exercise, and negative thinking. You have the ability to choose the emotions you have. If you don’t like feeling guilty, frustrated, or doubtful, you can choose not to. You, and no one else, must decide what is comfortable for you. In order to become successful at making healthy choices, you must avoid negative self­ talk and start practicing positive thinking. Positive or negative self-talk plays a big part in your decisions. Be on the look-out for negative self-talk and notice how it influences your choices; notice how it can negatively affect your efforts to change. For example, perhaps you’ve just returned from a week’s vacation where you took a break from exercise and low-fat eating. You tell yourself, ‘I feel so fat. I’m back where I started.’ You feel guilty and frustrated. ‘I don’t have enough will-power to start all over again. Maybe I’m just meant to be overweight.’ Feeling overwhelmed and discouraged, you give up.

First, reflect on the feelings you had before you decided to give up. You basically told yourself that the healthy habits you learned before your vacation were all for nothing and that you have to start over. Ask yourself if these feelings are reasonable. Are you really back to ground zero? Of course not. You accepted change and developed a new way of living; these skills are yours forever. The vacation might even have done you some good: everyone needs a break sometimes. Otherwise, you might have felt deprived and not really enjoyed yourself. It’s time now to tell yourself: ‘It felt good eating whatever I wanted and taking a break from exercising; I had a great time. But now I’m going to focus back on the low-fat, active lifestyle I was enjoying before vacation. There is no reason to beat myself up; I’ll just take it one day at a time.’ Now you can rethink your previous decision and take action that will move you forward towards more positive change.

As you begin to understand your reasons for negative self­ talk, you’ll find yourself recognizing it more and more quickly after it occurs. Eventually, as you practice, you’ll be able to recognize and stop negative self-talk before it interferes with your decisions.

It is very important to practice positive thinking and to remind yourself that you’re a worthwhile person whatever you do. Try to consistently acknowledge that you are making positive changes to improve your health. You should be proud of yourself. Visualize yourself as capable, happy, and confident. These positive feelings will help the process of change. Remember, there are bound to be times when you’re feeling frustrated or depressed. Positive thinkers know that these feelings are valid, and they don’t try to ignore them. Positive thinkers acknowledge and try to understand them, but they don’t blame themselves for the conditions that lead to these feelings. Good luck, stay positive, and enjoy all the wonderful benefits of a healthy lifestyle!

article from www.bodybuilding-workouts.org

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Stick With It!

Wednesday, March 16th, 2011

Sticking With It!
-Joseph Ash, NASM-CPT
Manager CoachMeFit West Bloomfield

There aren’t many people out there that haven’t met a fitness goal, and then let it go to waste. Whether it’s those ten pounds you just took off, or running three days a week. Once we have met a goal it’s very easy to fall back into your old routine of eating junk and being inactive. Instead of making a one month fitness goal look farther into the future, and then make short term goals to get you there.

You Determine Your Own Fitness Level
by Shawn Lebrun
Did you know that how you live, day to day, determines the level of fitness and muscularity you’ll achieve?
It’s true, if you have a lifestyle that supports weight(fat) loss, you will not have to worry about being overweight. If your lifestyle is not supportive of fat loss and staying fit, then it really doesn’t matter what you do in the gym, your results will be limited.

It’s when you expect one thing and do something totally opposite trying to get it that there becomes a problem.
If you weight train intensely, do your cardio consistently, and support yourself nutritionally, you’ll get leaner, stronger, and more fit. It happens. Certain steps lead to certain destinations.
But doing things repeatedly that DO NOT support your goals will ensure you DO NOT reach them.

Here are some examples;

It’s the new year and you decide one of your resolutions is to lose weight, specifically 15 pounds of fat. You give up your old, pleasurable lifestyle of eating burgers and fries four nights a week while watching your favorite T.V. shows.
Your new, improved lifestyle involves eating salads and chicken breasts and exercising at the time you used to watch your T.V. shows.
You’re so determined to lose this weight that you sacrifice all sense of fun for the next four weeks while you continue to exercise each night, skipping the fast food and T.V. Four weeks have gone by and you’ve indeed lost your goal weight of 15 pounds. So you figure, hey, I’ve done it, now I can celebrate a bit. I’m going to cut back a bit on the exercise now that I’ve lost the weight I wanted and I think I’ll see what’s on the T.V.

You go to the fridge for a snack and realize you haven’t gone shopping for your healthy foods yet this week.
But hey, there’s still those burgers and fries in the fridge, and you’ve earned a little celebration meal.
Soon, the lost pleasure of eating this delicious food and watching your favorite TV show returns and feels so great. So you do it again the next night, and the next, etc….

The old, unproductive habits have crept back into your life and have now influenced the newer, more productive ones. Your lifestyle is nothing more than what you do, day in and day out. It can either support your fitness goals or hurt them.
If you want to shed some body fat yet you continue to take days off from cardio because you’re not motivated enough to do it, that’s part of your lifestyle.

What you choose to do each day will influence what you get in return.
Make small, improved lifestyle changes that support your fitness goals and continue them until they become habit. Then move on to another small change that benefits you, replacing an older, less productive habit.

In fact, by making lifestyle changes in moderation, you increase the likelihood that these changes will be permanent.
Anytime that you go back to the unproductive lifestyle that caused you to be overweight, the weight you lost can return again.
The solution? Do not rule out all sense of pleasure when you decide to go after your fitness goal.

In fact, your fitness goals of being slimmer, more muscular, and more confident should be more pleasurable than burgers or fries.
If your surrounding environment and habits (cookies, cake, ice cream in front of the TV) do not contribute to your fitness goals, you need to make a change so that what you eat and do each day does.

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Should I change up my workout routine?

Friday, February 18th, 2011

Joseph Ash West Bloomfield Manager

NASM-CPT

No matter who you are, change is a constant part of life. Change can be scary, but necessary to grow.  My newest change will be going from a personal trainer to managing CoachMeFit West Bloomfield. This will create new challenges for me as well as the opportunity to grow. This concept also applies to your workout.  Like in life, change in your workout routine will create new opportunity to grow.  This brings up the question…


To change or not to change…that is the question.

The answer – change can be a good thing. In fact, varying your exercise routine can have a number of benefits, including preventing boredom and avoiding plateau.

Tired of the same ol’ same ol’?

You’re not alone. Many people find that doing the same workouts over and over becomes monotonous, and as a result they may begin to lose their desire to continue to exercise on a regular basis. Research has shown however that adding variety to an exercise program can help to improve adherence. Exercise scientists as the University of Florida observed that individuals who modified their workouts every two weeks over an eight-week period appeared to enjoy their workouts more, and were more inclined to stick with their exercise programs when compared to individuals who followed the same workout regimens week after week.

So what’s in it for me?

Aside from alleviating boredom, varying your exercise routine can also help you stay physically challenged. Many of the body’s physiological systems (e.g., the muscular systems) adapt to an exercise program within approximately six to eight weeks. Failure to modify your exercise routine will cause you to reach a plateau, as your body will have adapted to the repetitive training stimulus.

I want to change, but I don’t know how.

There are several ways you can spice up your current workout routine, including boosting the intensity of your workouts. For instance, if you jog or run, try incorporating some intervals of sprinting (e.g., sprint to a given landmark, then jog to the next one) or adding more hill work to your run. You can also cross train and perform different activities to provide your body with a new challenge. A nice alternative for resistance-training exercises involves changing the sequence in which you perform the training exercises. By fatiguing the muscles in a new order or pattern, you are requiring them to adapt to a new training stimulus. Another option for adding variety to strength-training workouts is to replace some or all of the exercises in your workout routine (e.g., substitute a dumbbell pectoral fly exercise on a stability ball for your typical barbell bench press exercise).

What if change isn’t for me?

While there are many benefits to varying your exercise routine, keep in mind that doing the exact same workout, day after day is not necessarily a bad thing. Some people enjoy a predictable, consistent routine, and they don’t mind the possibility of experiencing a training plateau as they are content to maintain their health and fitness levels with a comfortable exercise habit.

However, if you are one of the many individuals that has desire to take your workouts to new levels and to try different activities in order to stay enthusiastic and excited about exercise, go ahead and embrace change and add something new to your workout today! Remember that by varying exercise routines, you will not only stay physically challenged, but mentally stimulated as well.

- Jessica Matthews www.acefitness.org

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HAPPY NEW YEAR!

Tuesday, December 28th, 2010

Hungry Girl’s Magical Low-Calorie Margarita                                                                           

(Entire recipe: 115 calories, 0g fat, 55mg sodium, 2g carbs, 0g fiber, <0.5g sugars, 0g protein = 2 Weight Watchers Points)

 

Ingredients:

3/4 cup Sierra Mist Free (or Diet Sprite Zero, or your other fave no-cal lemon-lime soda)
*1.5 oz. tequila
1 packet (two 5-calorie servings) sugar-free powdered drink mix, lemonade (like the one by Crystal Light) 2 tbsp. lime juice
Optional: lime slice for garnish and salt or no-calorie sweetener for rim of glass

 

Directions:

If desired, run some lime juice along the rim of the glass and dip into a dish of salt or sweetener. Mix all ingredients together. Pour over 1 cup of crushed ice. Optional: Garnish with lime slice. Enjoy. Serves 1!

*You can also make your margaritas alcohol-free. Each recipe, without tequila, contains around 20 calories!

 

This recipe is from www.hungry-girl.com

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Love Your Fit Life in 2011

Wednesday, December 15th, 2010

Kelly Kalbfleisch, NPTI Certified Personal Trainer

Manager of CoachMeFit Ann Arbor

Is sticking to your New Year’s fitness resolution a challenge for you?  If so, it’s probably time for a new approach.  Though that “January high” can be a great tool for kick starting your motivation, committing fulltime to a healthy lifestyle is the only way to a lean, fit body with lasting power.  More than 80 percent of people who lose weight eventually gain it back, according to a study by the University of California, Los Angeles, and that means you need a no-quit plan that will keep you inspired for life. 

The cycle of gaining and losing weight has been linked to hypertension (a risk factor for cardiovascular disease) in a study in the International Journal of Obesity.  So to keep the pounds off for good and boost your health too, follow these few tips.  They’ll make your weight training, cardio and clean eating fun, so that you’ll never slack, give up or regain.

Go Outside the Box

  • 1. Take a new fitness class.

Changing the skills you work on will improve the way your brain processes all the movements, researchers report in a recent issue of the journal Neuroscience.

  • 2. Experiment with a new vegetable every week.
  • 3. Try mornings.

Set a fit tone for your whole day by performing a light cardio warm-up and just 15 minutes of body-weight exercise in your bedroom before getting on with the rest of the items on your “to do” list.

Make It Social

  • 1. With your coworker.

Hit the treadmill together on your lunch break.  Cover your display screens, set the timer for 30 minutes and see who burns more calories.

  • 2. With your foodie friend.

Swap your favorite recipes and brainstorm ways to make them healthier (like ditching the white spaghetti pasta for zucchini strips the next time you have an Italian night- use your carrot peeler)!

Shake Up Your Routine

  • 1. Beat boredom.

Instead of relying on machines, add in a combination of dumbbell, resistance band and body weight moves to hit your muscles from multiple angles, using different modalities.

  • 2. Start your workout with a different exercise than usual.

Simply switching around the order of your regular routine can stimulate both your muscles and your mind, according to the American Council on Exercise (ACE).

Create a Fit Environment

  • 1. Choose a route home from work that passes by a gym.

Seeing others coming in and out in their fitness gear will get you pumped to join in.

  • 2. Find motivating quotes in magazines, books and on the internet.

Post them in places you’re most likely to see, such as above your desk at work or on the bathroom mirror.

  • 3. Write down a new fitness or nutrition goal each week.

Post your goal on the fridge.  Keep it simple, such as spending an extra 10 minutes in the gym each day or topping off your meal with an extra heaping cup of veggies.

Treat Yourself

  • 1. Buy a new pair of shoes.

Splurge on a new pair of running or performance shoes.  It will motivate you for your next workout.

  • 2. Download a new song.

It’s amazing what a catchy tune can do for your spirits.

Add more fun to your fit routine.  You’ll drop fat, improve your health and keep the pounds off- for good!

Article by Kasia Kurek and Sarah Tuff

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No Slacking

Tuesday, December 7th, 2010

By: Amber Tebeau, NASM CPT, Manager and Trainer CoachMeFit West Bloomfield

This is not the time to slack off on exercise and healthy eating.  As was stated in my last blog, on November 19, 2010, simply eating an extra 200 calories a day between Thanksgiving and the end of January will cause a 5 pound holiday weight gain.  With all of the hard work that you have done over the last year, it would be very discouraging to gain five pounds at the end of this year.   Amidst the activities and parties of this holiday season, make a commitment to yourself and to your health to stay true to your daily workouts and your healthy eating habits.  Be sure to try new, healthier recipes this holiday season.  Check out websites such as www.cookinglight.com, www.weightwatchers.com,  and www.hungrygirl.com  for traditional recipes with a healthier twist.  Also, find a buddy to keep you accountable.  This can be in the form of a personal trainer, a friend or a family member.  It is always more fun to workout with someone, and during this busy time of year it is essential to have accountability.

As we look forward to 2011, avoid making and breaking a New Year’s resolution to lose weight.  Today is the day to give yourself the best holiday gift you can, the gift of health.   Make a commitment to make a life change to live a more active healthier lifestyle.

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Healthy Holiday Eating Tips

Friday, November 19th, 2010

 

By: Amber Tebeau NASM CPT, Manager and Trainer CoachMeFit West Bloomfield

During the holiday season, CoachMeFit in West Bloomfield likes to have a weightloss contest.  The goal of the contest is for our clients to maintain or lose weight during the holidays.  Last year we only had one client that did not lost weight; our clients were really excited about their success.  The following is a copy of some tips that we give our clients to help them  get through the holidays without weight gain.

Here’s some scary food for thought: to gain five pounds from now to the end of January, all you have to do is eat an average of 200 calories per day more than you need — an ounce of fudge here, an ounce of gravy there, some pecan pie. If you need to ‘get a grip’ on eating splurges, the winter holiday months are key to your long range planning. The holidays typically encourage people to indulge in high-fat, high-calorie foods that are low in nutrients, and this is also the time we’re most likely to make excuses for skipping exercise.

 

One of the most significant diet dangers revolves around sugar consumption. Problems arise from riding on a sugar roller coaster. When you binge on sugar, you crave more and more and your body slows down. Along with sunlight deprivation, sugar binges cause a drop in serotonin, a chemical in the brain that regulates sleep and appetite. A lack of serotonin is often associated with depression. When you’re deprived of serotonin, you won’t feel calm and in control.

To help boost your serotonin level naturally, eat small but frequent meals that include complex, starchy veggies. You can also help control blood sugar levels by eating small quantities of protein three times a day. For example, eat two egg whites in the morning, some turkey at lunch and a small portion of grilled fish at night.

 

You should keep up your regular exercise during the holidays and accept no excuses. When endorphins are high, you’ll cope better with stress, and regular exercise boosts endorphins.

Here are some other holiday survival tips:

·         Exercise 30 min to 60 min a day during the holidays. Exercise to burn calories, relieve stress, and elevate your endorphins and mood such as a brisk walk, run, or bike-ride.

·         Avoid eating no fat. Eating moderate amounts of fat during the holidays will satiate the appetite and prevent overeating of carbs (about 35-65 grams per day will be sufficient for most people.)

·         Don’t skip meals. Hunger and low blood sugar lead to overeating.

·         Don’t pass up favorite foods or deprive yourself completely. Moderate consumption is the key.

·         Don’t tempt yourself by keeping trigger foods or comfort foods around the house. If you have them, it certainly increases the likelihood that you will overeat.

·         Plan meals by keeping in mind the demands you’ll have on your schedule that day.

·         Don’t go to a party starving. Before you leave home, eat something light or drink a protein shake. Also drink a great deal of water the day of the party.

·         When you attend holiday festivities, don’t station yourself near the buffet table. Make a clear-cut decision to distance yourself from all goodies.

·         If you do find yourself feeling depressed, soothe your spirit with a massage, manicure, pedicure, or facial. Men can enjoy this too!

·         When you shop, eat before you leave home so you won’t resort to cookie breaks.

·         To satisfy your sweet tooth, set limits. For example, you might allow yourself two desserts per week at 250 calories each.

·         Just because it is the holidays doesn’t mean you should give yourself the license to eat everything that passes by. Factor in the little extras into your daily intake.

·         Help out by saving fat and calories when it’s feasting time. Make or buy wild-rice stuffing, baked sweet potatoes and whole-grain rolls.

·         If you are staying with family or friends ask them if you can have a space in the refrigerator and keep foods on hand to snack on like lean deli meats, cottage cheese, nonfat cheese sticks, etc.

·         If you are at the mercy of the dinner host, eat modest amounts of the foods offered and fill up on foods with more fiber and fewer calories. Make a small plate and skip the seconds.

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In A Rut?

Tuesday, November 2nd, 2010

Kelly Kalbfleisch, NPTI Certified Personal Trainer

Manager of CoachMeFit Ann Arbor

I’m not going to lie….I’m a trainer and I’m in an exercise rut.  We all go through the ups and downs of an exercise routine.  As I was thinking about a blog, I thought I may as well write about what I’m going through to get some motivation while helping others who are in the same place as me!  I came across the article below.  It talks mostly about weight loss, but I am replacing the weight loss feel of the article to fit into what I need to get out of my fitness routines.  Whatever your fitness goal(s), you can use this article’s tips to get you back on track. 

To stick around and work, weight loss has to fit within the bigger picture — and then made into a daily priority. Like a movie extra struggling to be seen on a blockbuster film, if weight loss isn’t in the big picture, it won’t get watched.

Weight loss is a classic “out of sight, out of mind” matter. If you’re busy with big picture stuff (which hopefully you are), weight loss may feel forgotten and start to get in the way. Unless, of course, it becomes part of that bigger picture. Knowing the role that fitness plays gives you the motivation to keep going strong.
 
First, put weight loss up on the big screen. List the things that losing weight will help you do. Want to be a better parent? Improve your work performance? Stick around to see your grandkids? Are travel, horseback riding, racecar driving, home improvement and other high-energy activities important to you?
 
These reasons can be made into motivators. They’ll be more energizing than looking at the scale any day of the week.

Second, make fitness a daily priority. Some ideas:

  • Do your goal activities early before distractions hit.
  • Arrange your day and menu ahead of time and stick to the plan.
  • Create a reward system that’s related to your big picture. For example, if you’re in this to boost your confidence, reward yourself for small wins by putting $1 in a “stepping out” fund.
  • Pack lunches and avoid eating out.
  • Carry a picture of your main motivators.
  • Find reasons to be with and talk to positive, upbeat people with similar goals.

With the steps above, you help yourself realize that weight loss can have real meaning — that if you stop using smart fitness strategies or stop eating your veggies, you’re losing more than some weight loss momentum. You’re potentially holding yourself back from living the life that you love.

By: Mike Kramer, staff writer for sparkpeople.com

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Homemade Meal Replacement Bars

Wednesday, October 27th, 2010

Combine in Large Mixing Bowl

8 Scoops Whey (Vanilla is very good)
3 Cups Oats
1 Package Sugar Free Fat Free Pudding (Any flavor is good)
2 Cups Skim Milk

Mix until a sticky batter is formed (may take a few minutes)

Use a large spoon to spread out the mix into the bottom of a Pam-sprayed glass or metal cooking tray (spread until even)
put in the fridge overnight and cut into 8 equal bars that yield:
3g fat
28g carbs
29g protein
257 calories
These bars taste amazing, and are perfect for: breakfast, pre OR post workout.

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Bombay Chicken ‘n’ Rice Recipe

Tuesday, October 12th, 2010

Kelly Kalbfleisch, NPTI Certified Personal Trainer

Manager of CoachMeFit Ann Arbor

A recipe hasn’t been posted lately, so I decided to take that route this week.  This recipe can be prepared without chicken, for those of you who don’t eat meat.  Also, you can add fresh chicken breast as opposed to the canned chicken.  A very versatile recipe.  I hope you enjoy!

Servings:
4 people

INGREDIENTS
1 10-oz can chunk chicken breast, drained and flaked
1 6-oz box curry rice-pilaf mix
1 14-oz can diced tomatoes, drained
1 8-oz can peas, drained
1/2 cup unsalted cashews

PREPARATION

Prepare the rice according to package directions. After 15 minutes of simmering, stir in the chicken, tomatoes, and peas. Simmer for 10 to 15 minutes more, until the rice is tender and most of the liquid is absorbed. Top with the cashews.

NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION

Calories: 364 calories
Carbs: 49 g
Sodium: 1061 mg
Fat: 10 g
Protein: 22 g
Fiber: 6 mg

From the Abs Diet

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