Archive for March, 2011

PEP TALK

Wednesday, March 30th, 2011
Kelly Kalbfleisch, NPTI Certified Personal Trainer
Manager of CoachMeFit Ann Arbor

 

This month a few of my clients have been experiencing negativity with exercise, their progress, outside comments, eating etc…. We all go through it!  Yes, even me.  I thought this week we could all use a little pep talk about how to get through these negative times. 

Negative self-talk is a destructive habit and part of an essential defense mechanism that we often develop to protect ourselves. Many people end up talking themselves out of actions that may be scary or uncomfortable. ‘I can’t do this’ is really just a way of saying ‘I don’t want to deal with the experience of doing this.’ We are all strongly influenced by our feelings, often determining how and what action we ultimately take. If the feeling is uncomfortable, negative self-talk results; then we often decide not to take any action at all.

Many people assume that if a past experience produced a certain result, there is nothing they can do to change that experience in order to produce a different result. ‘I’ve tried every diet there is. I know what I should do; I just can’t do it.’

Please understand that you make the choice not to repeat old patterns of eating, non-exercise, and negative thinking. You have the ability to choose the emotions you have. If you don’t like feeling guilty, frustrated, or doubtful, you can choose not to. You, and no one else, must decide what is comfortable for you. In order to become successful at making healthy choices, you must avoid negative self­ talk and start practicing positive thinking. Positive or negative self-talk plays a big part in your decisions. Be on the look-out for negative self-talk and notice how it influences your choices; notice how it can negatively affect your efforts to change. For example, perhaps you’ve just returned from a week’s vacation where you took a break from exercise and low-fat eating. You tell yourself, ‘I feel so fat. I’m back where I started.’ You feel guilty and frustrated. ‘I don’t have enough will-power to start all over again. Maybe I’m just meant to be overweight.’ Feeling overwhelmed and discouraged, you give up.

First, reflect on the feelings you had before you decided to give up. You basically told yourself that the healthy habits you learned before your vacation were all for nothing and that you have to start over. Ask yourself if these feelings are reasonable. Are you really back to ground zero? Of course not. You accepted change and developed a new way of living; these skills are yours forever. The vacation might even have done you some good: everyone needs a break sometimes. Otherwise, you might have felt deprived and not really enjoyed yourself. It’s time now to tell yourself: ‘It felt good eating whatever I wanted and taking a break from exercising; I had a great time. But now I’m going to focus back on the low-fat, active lifestyle I was enjoying before vacation. There is no reason to beat myself up; I’ll just take it one day at a time.’ Now you can rethink your previous decision and take action that will move you forward towards more positive change.

As you begin to understand your reasons for negative self­ talk, you’ll find yourself recognizing it more and more quickly after it occurs. Eventually, as you practice, you’ll be able to recognize and stop negative self-talk before it interferes with your decisions.

It is very important to practice positive thinking and to remind yourself that you’re a worthwhile person whatever you do. Try to consistently acknowledge that you are making positive changes to improve your health. You should be proud of yourself. Visualize yourself as capable, happy, and confident. These positive feelings will help the process of change. Remember, there are bound to be times when you’re feeling frustrated or depressed. Positive thinkers know that these feelings are valid, and they don’t try to ignore them. Positive thinkers acknowledge and try to understand them, but they don’t blame themselves for the conditions that lead to these feelings. Good luck, stay positive, and enjoy all the wonderful benefits of a healthy lifestyle!

article from www.bodybuilding-workouts.org

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Stick With It!

Wednesday, March 16th, 2011

Sticking With It!
-Joseph Ash, NASM-CPT
Manager CoachMeFit West Bloomfield

There aren’t many people out there that haven’t met a fitness goal, and then let it go to waste. Whether it’s those ten pounds you just took off, or running three days a week. Once we have met a goal it’s very easy to fall back into your old routine of eating junk and being inactive. Instead of making a one month fitness goal look farther into the future, and then make short term goals to get you there.

You Determine Your Own Fitness Level
by Shawn Lebrun
Did you know that how you live, day to day, determines the level of fitness and muscularity you’ll achieve?
It’s true, if you have a lifestyle that supports weight(fat) loss, you will not have to worry about being overweight. If your lifestyle is not supportive of fat loss and staying fit, then it really doesn’t matter what you do in the gym, your results will be limited.

It’s when you expect one thing and do something totally opposite trying to get it that there becomes a problem.
If you weight train intensely, do your cardio consistently, and support yourself nutritionally, you’ll get leaner, stronger, and more fit. It happens. Certain steps lead to certain destinations.
But doing things repeatedly that DO NOT support your goals will ensure you DO NOT reach them.

Here are some examples;

It’s the new year and you decide one of your resolutions is to lose weight, specifically 15 pounds of fat. You give up your old, pleasurable lifestyle of eating burgers and fries four nights a week while watching your favorite T.V. shows.
Your new, improved lifestyle involves eating salads and chicken breasts and exercising at the time you used to watch your T.V. shows.
You’re so determined to lose this weight that you sacrifice all sense of fun for the next four weeks while you continue to exercise each night, skipping the fast food and T.V. Four weeks have gone by and you’ve indeed lost your goal weight of 15 pounds. So you figure, hey, I’ve done it, now I can celebrate a bit. I’m going to cut back a bit on the exercise now that I’ve lost the weight I wanted and I think I’ll see what’s on the T.V.

You go to the fridge for a snack and realize you haven’t gone shopping for your healthy foods yet this week.
But hey, there’s still those burgers and fries in the fridge, and you’ve earned a little celebration meal.
Soon, the lost pleasure of eating this delicious food and watching your favorite TV show returns and feels so great. So you do it again the next night, and the next, etc….

The old, unproductive habits have crept back into your life and have now influenced the newer, more productive ones. Your lifestyle is nothing more than what you do, day in and day out. It can either support your fitness goals or hurt them.
If you want to shed some body fat yet you continue to take days off from cardio because you’re not motivated enough to do it, that’s part of your lifestyle.

What you choose to do each day will influence what you get in return.
Make small, improved lifestyle changes that support your fitness goals and continue them until they become habit. Then move on to another small change that benefits you, replacing an older, less productive habit.

In fact, by making lifestyle changes in moderation, you increase the likelihood that these changes will be permanent.
Anytime that you go back to the unproductive lifestyle that caused you to be overweight, the weight you lost can return again.
The solution? Do not rule out all sense of pleasure when you decide to go after your fitness goal.

In fact, your fitness goals of being slimmer, more muscular, and more confident should be more pleasurable than burgers or fries.
If your surrounding environment and habits (cookies, cake, ice cream in front of the TV) do not contribute to your fitness goals, you need to make a change so that what you eat and do each day does.

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