Archive for the ‘Road Race Training’ Category

Put Some Spring into your Fitness Routine!

Monday, April 14th, 2014

Put Some Spring in your Fitness Routine
Lori Withrow, B.S. Exercise Science

Spring has sprung! It’s time to throw back the curtains, open the windows, clear the
house of winter clutter, and pack away the sweatshirts in exchange for short sleeves.
It’s also a great time to clean up your fitness routine. After months of stale gym air and
temperatures to cold for outdoor exercise, our bodies and mental health are begging for
some spring! Here are few tips to get you started.!

spring running

 
1. Consider throwing away worn-out workout clothes and replacing them with
breathable, wick fabrics. If you’ve been hitting the gym all winter, chances are you’re
also due for a new pair of shoes. Not only will you look great in your new gear, but you’ll
feel great too.
2. Try breaking up your routine with outdoor exercises like tennis, golf, hiking or kicking
the soccer ball around the yard with your kids. Remember, all activity counts! Plus,
varying your workouts can help improve performance and reduce risk of overuse
injuries. By doing a variety of different activities, such as running, weight training, hiking,
bootcamp classes or biking, you limit the stress on one specific muscle group because
different activities use muscles in slightly different ways.

IslBG
3. Add jumping rope to your workout and you can burn around 208 calories in just 20
minutes. Include other exercises like walking lunges, sprints, and jumping jacks, and
you’ve got yourself a circuit program you can do right in your backyard. You can also
include wrist and ankle weights to your daily routine. The resistance will help strengthen
and tone up arm and leg muscles.

4. By drinking about two liters of water a day, and 17 ounces about two hours before
activity, you can avoid muscle cramping and fatigue. If you’re headed outdoors for
activity, take water with you. Keep in mind, the more you sweat, the more fluids you
need to replace!!

5. Add positive goals to your fitness routine such as a 5k, or mini triathlon. It will make
you feel better and also give a purpose to your training other than just reaching a certain
weight or size. Another fun option is to enlist a group of friends to join your quest. Try
researching some of your local fun runs and obstacle courses (such as the warrior
dash, color run and the foam fest)that are becoming so popular these days. Having a
group of people to train with is way more fun and encouraging then going stag.

6. Remember, slow but steady wins the race. Try to get some activity at least 3-4 times
per week, but adjust your intensity based on activity you’ve had over the winter. If you
haven’t done much, it will take a few weeks to establish a good fitness base. If you’re
taking your exercise from indoor to outdoor, remember a 2 mile run on the treadmill is
going to feel different then a 2 mile run outside. Start small, and work up.

7. Keep in mind, spring training is a time for refreshing, light-hearted exercise. So relax
and enjoy your activity. Consider a sports massage to pamper yourself, while alleviating
toxins and speeding up muscle recovery. Most importantly, don’t forget to have fun!!

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The heat is on…enjoy summer, safely!

Wednesday, July 3rd, 2013

Summer is here, which means more time to be outdoors–for exercise! Go out and enjoy your run, some outdoor yoga, or a brisk walk. These are the longest days of the year…soak it up!

push-harder

5 Tips for Running in the Heat

Cool down before your workout
Olympic athletes actually wear special cooling vests before training in hot and steamy conditions, which helps to lower their risk for overheating. But you don’t have to go to that extreme to get a similar effect, says Gibson. Fifteen to 20 minutes before your run, take a quick rinse in the shower under cold water, or simply rinse your hands in cool water immediately before heading out the door. Alternatively, you could whip up a DIY slushy by blending ice (either on its own or combined with a bit of a sports drink) and drink it before heading out.

Drink up
Ideally, you should start hydrating one hour before you hit the road, says Gibson. The key is to not just chug a bunch of liquid at once, but to allow it to slowly absorb into your system. That means taking small, frequent sips—not gulping down a cup of water right before you lace up. And keep drinking while you’re out there—you need more fluid in the heat since you lose more of it through your sweat, says Gibson. Everyone’s fluid intake needs are different, but it’s easy to figure out what yours are: Weigh yourself before and after your next run. If you lose more than two percent of your body weight, bump up your fluid intake by ½ cup during your next workout.

Replace electrolytes
What you eat before, during, and after your workout is one thing that shouldn’t change much, says Gibson. But your body does chew through more carbs on a sweaty run than it would on a cooler day. A sports drink can help you maintain your energy levels and replace electrolytes lost through sweating. “Normally, I’d recommend sipping a sports drink (or a 1:1 solution of sports drink to water) only during runs lasting 60-plus minutes,” says Gibson. “But since the heat puts more stress on your body, it’s smart to do this for shorter runs in these temps too.”

Think cool thoughts
Imagine that you’re in another, much colder, location (think: a mountain resort in the winter). Use mental imagery and really imagine the environment and think about how the cool, crisp air feels against your skin. “Your mind is super powerful, and you can use it to convince your body to feel a certain way or do a certain thing,” says Cogan. “Talking yourself into feeling cooler isn’t going to change the fact that your body is hot and must work to cool down, but it can make you feel less uncomfortable and more motivated to keep running.”

Give it a positive spin
Replace thoughts like “Ugh, I hate the heat” with more positive affirmations such as “The heat is just part of the experience—the good part is that it’s working my muscles even harder than normal.” “Find some way to make it a positive for yourself, even if you don’t totally buy it,” says Cogan. This is one case where “fake it until you make it” definitely applies.

…And don’t forget the sunscreen, sunglasses, and a hat to protect yourself from the sun. Running–or any activity–in the heat can feel great, as long as you take care of yourself.

What are you waiting for?

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Let’s take it outside!

Friday, April 19th, 2013

 

 

Jen Rowley, A.C.E. Certified Personal Trainer
Manager of CoachMeFit Ann Arbor
 
 
springintofitness

I think we can safely say that spring has sprung! There has been some sunshine, some warm days, and….no more snow! Time to get outside and reap the benefits of all that Mother Nature has to offer.

There is some surprising research-backed news that says “green exercise” may be the best way to lose weight, feel great, and even get smarter. Breathe in some fresh air and chances are you will want to exercise. Being outside is more playful and fun, therefore making your workouts seem less like work!

Here are some more outdoor benefits:

1. Choosing a sunrise workout outside may help you fall asleep faster at night. Natural light resets circadian rhythms, so it may be easier to nod off, according to experts at the Lighting Research Center.

2. Just seeing the color green may make you feel better during your workout, due to its calming effect.

3. It is better and cheaper than therapy! After just five minutes of any outdoor exercise, you’re happier and more confident. This boost can last all day!

4. Creativity and ideas come to you faster. After an hour of nature-time, sans tech gadgets, research shows a 50% increase in creativity.

5. Nature is the new coffee! Just 20 active minutes outside can wake up your mind and body, making you feel more alive. And, it won’t cost you $4!

6. You can gain a sense of peace. Exercisers reported being less tense and tired, and calmer, during any activity done outside. Probably due to the fresh air that your body craves and the serene surroundings.

www.shape.com

Ok, so now what? Great news–CoachMeFit is starting up a new running club! Club CMF is getting geared up to start in the next couple of weeks. Here are some details:

*a non-competitive way to get an extra cardio day

*a good reason to get outside with fellow runners

*guided warm-up provided

*map, easy conversation, multiple paces, and fun company provided

*guided stretching post-run

*variety of recovery drinks and snacks will be provided post-run

This group will be open to CMF clients and non-clients! We are hoping to have a good-sized group of people to keep each other motivated and accountable to your exercise plan. Also, the guided warm-up and post-run stretching will be useful for those who generally skip these very important steps. And the post-run snacks will educate those  who may have questions regarding calorie, protein, and sugar intake for  healthy muscle recovery. More information to come–please see our posting in the CoachMeFit studio!

See you in–and out of– the studio!

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Adjusting Your Expectations

Thursday, October 7th, 2010

By: Amber Tebeau NASM CPT, Manager and Trainer CoachMeFit West Bloomfield

Sometimes life throws you a curveball and you must adjust accordingly.  In the blog posted on July 9, 2010, I talked about my 10k race goal.  I explained that I wanted to run a race in 8 minute splits at the end of August.  I researched running plans and picked the one that fit me best.  My training was going well and my runs were improving.  As I was nearing the race, my runs were getting longer and my pace was getting faster.  I was well on my way to achieving my 8 minute splits.  The goal I had set for myself was a great motivator and I was determined to reach it.  However, my plans were about to change.  In the beginning of August I found out that I was expecting a baby.  Though it was completely safe for me to continue running, it was not safe for me to continue training at the level I was training.  I was ecstatic about being pregnant; however the athlete in me was a little bummed that I would have to put off my goal for a year.   During pregnancy it is important to exercise, but one must be careful to not become overheated or overexerted.  Though I continued running, I am careful to listen to my body and to follow what it is telling me.  If I am too tired or I am having trouble breathing, I slow my pace to a walk or take a break.  The biggest hindrance to my running has been my first trimester fatigue.  Though I was tired through those first weeks, I made sure to still exercise an hour a day, 5-6 days a week.   I did run a race on August 27th, however I decided to run the 5k instread of the 10k.   Even though I did not accomplish my goal, I was proud to have finished the race and to have finished well.  I came in 2nd place in my age group.

It is very important that we set goals for ourselves; however, it is just as important that we listen to our bodies and act accordingly.  Though I was disappointed that I could no longer train towards my race goal, I was wise enough to recognize that my priorities had changed.  The most important thing in my life is now the health and safety of my baby.

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The Importance of Setting Goals

Friday, July 9th, 2010

By: Amber Tebeau, NASM CPT, Manager CoachMeFit West Bloomfield

Goals help us to define what we want to do, why we want to do it, and how we are going to accomplish it.  I find that I always work harder when I have a clear goal in mind.  Currently I am training for a 10k race at the end of August.  When I decided to run this race I decided that I needed to set a goal time.  Though I do not consider myself to be a very good runner, I decided that I wanted to push myself and set a goal of running 8 minute splits for my race.  This is a very high, but attainable goal for me.  In order to achieve this goal I decided that I needed to enact a plan.   Though I have run in races in the past, I have never followed a strict running plan; I just ran whenever I wanted for as long as I felt was needed. Recently, I did some research on the internet and found a plan that I liked.  I modified it slightly to fit my schedule and created a calendar of the 10 weeks that I would be training.  Everyday when it is time for my workout, I look at my calendar to see how I need to train that day.  It takes the guess work out of my workouts because I know exactly what I am supposed to do.  It also pushes me to complete my scheduled workout even when I do not feel like pushing myself.  Similar to most people, I have days when I do not want to run or work out.  However, by having a high goal that I want to attain along with a set running schedule I am motivated to stay the course and work towards my goal.

CoachMeFit uses the goal setting formula of SMART-R.  This stands for Specific, Measurable, Action Oriented, Reasonable, Timed and Reasons why.  Let’s look at all of these elements closely and how they shaped my race goal. 

S -Specific – Goals should be detailed and clearly defined.  I set a specific goal of running a 10k race in 8 minutes miles.

M-Measurable – Goals should be measurable in order to measure progress and to ensure there is a defined ending to the goal.  I have a training plan that lays out specific workouts to help me to reach my 8 mile split goal.  I will be able to measure my success on race day when I see my final time.

A – Action Oriented – Goals can only be attained if action is taken.  The training plan that I follow gives me daily actions to complete in order to reach my goal.

R – Reasonable – Goals must be reasonable in order to be obtained.  I ran a 5k in 2009 with less than 8 minute splits; this leads me to believe that if my body is capable of running 8 minute splits for 3.1 miles, then with proper training, my body will also be able to run the same pace for 6.2 miles.

T-Timed – Goals must have a deadline, because deadlines move us to action.  The race is August 21, 2010, which is ten weeks from when I started my training.

R – Reasons Why – This is probably the most important step in the goal setting process.  Your “reason why” is your motivation for achieving the goal.  The reason why I am running this race is to push myself to be a better runner and to run a race that I never thought I could run.  In the past I would tell myself that I was a poor runner and that I could not run a 10k or run it well.  I would like to prove myself wrong and accomplish my goal of running a 10k and running it well.

Take a moment to think of something you would like to accomplish in the next couple months.  Once you have a goal that you would like to accomplish, walk through the steps of SMART-R to come up with a well defined plan of how you will accomplish this goal.  With a little hard work and a specific plan your goals will soon become a reality.

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1 Month to Go!

Friday, May 1st, 2009

Greetings all of you runners. Congratulations on making it this far in your training. The hard and heavy miles are setting in and it’s now time to really take care of your body. Remember here, it’s not when you are running that your are getting stronger, it’s when you are recovering! What I mean is, make sure you are enjoying your cross-training and rest days. At this point we all need to take care of our bodies as the workload is reaching it’s high point and the rest from that is of utmost importance. Are you remembering to take in enough water? Are you spending an extra 10 minutes after every run to stretch? One more tip is to make sure that you are getting high quality nutrients back into your system within 45 minutes of finishing your runs. Your body will need them to recover from the past run and prepare and store energy for your upcoming run. Train hard, listen to what your body is telling you, and have fun. Let me repeat the key concept for this week. “It’s not when your running that your body is getting stronger, it’s when your recovering.”

Here is also a quick update from Mike our runner.

Week of 4/20 running summary – Mike Ritsema:
 
Monday               5 miles in 39 minutes
Tuesday               5 miles in 40 minutes @ 142 bpm & 500 calories
Wednesday        Rest
Thursday             9 miles in 79 minutes @ 136 bpm avg. & 868 calories
Friday                   Rest
Saturday              Rest
Sunday                 9 miles in 80 minutes @ 137 bpm avg. & 952 calories
 
Notes & thoughts:
It was a busy week with a wedding and graduation commitment as well as business travel.
                Therefore, the schedule changed a little.  I felt pretty good on the 9 mile runs.  I am concerned about a 15 mile run though.

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YOU!

Friday, April 24th, 2009

Hello again everybody. It has been two weeks since we updated you on what our ginea pig Mike has been up to. So here is his latest. Mike seems to have followed the last blog entry and bought himself a new pair of shoes. Can you relate? Have you guys upped your water intake and stretching and core work? Keep at it, it will pay off. Stay focused on the prize, enjoy the nice spring weather, and continue becoming the runner, and person, you know you can be.

Week of 4/6 running summary – Mike Ritsema:
 
Monday               Rest
Tuesday               4 miles in 27 minutes @ 152 bpm
Wednesday        4.5 miles in 40 minutes at 135 bpm
Thursday             Rest
Friday                   7 miles in 56 minutes at 132 – 162 bpm & 565 cal.
Saturday              7 miles in 60 minutes at 141 – 143 bpm
Sunday                 Rest
 
Notes & thoughts:
I actually felt better on Saturday for the 7 miles than on Friday!
I do feel like I lack the energy at times.   Not so much the cardio, but just plain energy to burn.
I’m interested in better understanding this energy burn thing.
 
 
Week of 4/13 running summary – Mike Ritsema:
 
Monday               5 miles in 37 ½ minutes & 505 calories
Tuesday               Rest – busy
Wednesday        5 miles
Thursday             Rest
Friday                   8 miles in 67 minutes at 133 – 143 bpm & 828 cal.
Saturday              8 miles in 65 minutes at 143 – 143 bpm & 800 cal.
Sunday                 Rest
 
Notes & thoughts:
8 miles is a long haul alone.  My brother, Randy, helped me along for 5 miles on Saturday.  That helped.
These long runs are work, but building confidence.   I’m developing a nasty blister on the arch of my right foot.
I’m concerned.  I also am amazed by how my heart settle in at about 135 bpm in the middle of a long run. 
I also bought my annual – traditional new pair of shoes today.  That’ll help I’m sure.  I am paranoid about a pair of 9’s this weekend.
 
Michael Ritsema
i3 Business Solutions, llc
accelerating business results

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Tips for you Newbies (beginners)

Friday, April 10th, 2009

Hello everyone. I trust this entry finds you enjoying your training and working hard towards your goals. The picture will make sense at the end of the entry, so read on. For this entry I would like to address everyone who would consider themselves a beginner when it comes to following a running routine, or just to running in general. Being three weeks into this program I am sure you have it figured out how to structure your life around the program and also how your body is reacting to the training. Stay motivated at this point as it is now that your body is really making changes and producing visible results when it comes to your training. This can be a tough point in anyones training program as the excitement of starting has worn down and the realization of what lies ahead is in sight.  Due to this mental “road block” I thought I would put out a few suggestions, tips, and things to consider, just to keep you on track and getting maximal results from you efforts.

#1-WATER= We have all heard that the human body is somewhere between 60-70% water, and it’s true, and thats very important for your health. Just a simple 5% reduction in your bodies hydration status will result in a 20% decrease in it’s performance. That includes your performance in running, walking, thinking, recovering. When it comes to to doing a running/walking program such as this, it is absolutely essential that you are drinking enough water. Water helps your body flush out the bad, and circulate the good. It helps your body perform better, recover better, and flush out fat better. I could go on and on here, but what I am saying people is…DRINK MORE WATER!

#2-Shoes= If you did not buy a new pair of shoes in order to undertake this program, or very recently before it, I would suggest visiting your local running store and getting properly fitted for a running shoe that is specific to your needs. All of this training can take a strain on the body, and all of that stress and pounding that happens in running, starts with your feet. It is actually well proven that worn out shoes cause all types of running injuries. Shin splints, knee pain, muscle pulls, tightness, hip pain, can all sometimes be traced back to improper and worn out shoes. It would be a small investment that can pay huge dividends. I would hate to have any of you work so hard in your training only to come up injured before the race.

#3-Core Work= When it comes to running and walking, there is no debating the importance of having a strong core. Yes people, there is no substitute here for consistency and “crunches”. Elite runners have been proven to improve their running performance by 5% just by adding in consistent core workouts. I would suggest adding in 5-10 minutes of core work 3-4 days a week following your scheduled run/walk/or workout.

Follow those three suggestions and it will help you perform better, avoid injury, and enjoy your training. Have a great weekend everyone. Here is a funny qoute to finish off, this is what the rest of the world thinks about us runners.

“If morning runners knew how inticing they looked to morning drivers, they would stay home and do crunches”

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The Training Plan…in Action.

Thursday, April 2nd, 2009

http://www.fitnessvenues.com/FCKfiles/Image/sport_specific/hill_running.jpg

We are in the middle of week two of the training plan. I hope you are feeling motivated and positive about the progress you have made so far. Mike has given us another update on how his training has been going, as well as the obstacles that have been in his way. Good job everybody. Keep running, keep recovering, and remember that often the journey teaches you far more than the destination.

Week of 3/23 running summary – Mike Ritsema:

Monday               4 miles pretty hard

Tuesday               4 miles pretty hard

Wednesday        Rest

Thursday             47 minutes at 125 – 142 bpm avg. 135 bpm burned 505 calories

Friday                    4 miles in 34 minutes at 138 bpm

Saturday              Race:  10K – 6.2 miles in 47 minutes = 7:34 / mile

Sunday                 Rest

Notes & thoughts:

I’m a busy guy with lots of responsibilities.   Running is therapy to me.  I like to run and it stabilizes me – reorients me.  But, running isn’t the center of my universe.  I enjoy golf, biking and loafing too.  Besides that, I do run a business which is taking quite a bit of time and energy in this economy.   At my age, 51, my personal challenge includes both motivation and energy.   Sometimes, I just don’t have either to get me out the door.   That’s why I operate best when working out with others in a group.

I find this new workout plan intriguing.  I’ve read and discussed the methodology in the past.   Slowing down my pace to a reasonable burn rate is counterintuitive to me.   I’ve been running for over 35 years.  Brute force always seemed reasonable to me.  And, yes, I do haul around some ‘70s era concepts that may have been improved on over the last few decades.

I’ll continue putting on the miles in as close alignment to the training schedule as I’m able.

Michael Ritsema
i3 Business Solutions, llc

accelerating business results

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Time to lace up the shoes and Hit the pavement!

Wednesday, March 25th, 2009

Choose your level of running fitness, Choose your Goal, and begin following CoachMeFit’s plan for success. Work hard when the plan calls for it, rest when the plan calls for it, and take the first step, it’s always the hardest one.

5k Beginner

Week of:

Day 1

Day 2

Day 3

Day 4

Day 5

Day 6

Day 7

3/23

1.5mi run

Rest

Run/walk 30min (3min:3min)

Rest

1.5mi run

Rest

Cross-train or walk 30min

3/30

1.5mi run

Rest

Run/walk 30min

(4min:2min)

Rest

1.5mi run

Rest

Cross-train or walk 35min

4/6

1.5mi run

Rest

Run/walk 30min

(4min:2min)

Rest

2mi run

Rest

Cross-train or walk 40min

4/13

1.5mi run

Rest

Run/walk 30min

(4min:2min)

Rest

2mi run

Rest

Cross-train or walk 45min

4/20

2mi run

Rest

Run/walk 30min

(5min:1min)

Rest

2mi run

Rest

Cross-train or walk 45min

4/27

2mi run

Rest

Run/walk 30min

(5min:1min)

Rest

2.5mi run

Rest

Cross-train or walk 45min

4/4

2mi run

Rest

Run/walk 30min

(5min:1min)

Rest

2.5mi run

Rest

Cross-train or walk 45min

4/11

2mi run

Rest

2mi Maxiamal steady state

Rest

3mi run

Rest

Cross-train or walk 45min

4/18

2.5mi run

Rest

2.5mi run

Rest

2.5mi run

Rest

Cross-train or walk 45min

4/25

2.5mi run

Rest

2mi run

Rest

1.5mi run

Rest

RACE DAY

5k Intermediate

Week of:

Day 1

Day 2

Day 3

Day 4

Day 5

Day 6

Day 7

3/23

3mi run

Rest

3mi run

Cross-train 30min

Rest

4mi run

Rest or Cross-train 30min

3/30

3mi run

Rest

4mi run

Cross-train 30min

Rest

4mi run

Rest or Cross-train 30min

4/6

3mi run

Rest

4mi run

Cross-train 35min

Rest

5mi run

Rest or Cross-train 30min

4/13

4mi run

Rest

5x3min TI with 3min recovery

Cross-train 35min

Rest

6mi run

Rest or Cross-train 30min

4/20

5mi run

Rest

5x4min TI with 4min recovery

Cross-train 40min

Rest

6mi run

Rest or Cross-train 30min

4/27

5mi run

Rest

8x30sec sprints with 90sec recovery

Cross-train 40min

Rest

7mi run

Rest or Cross-train 30min

4/4

5mi run

Rest

10x30sec sprints with 90sec recovery

Cross-train 45min

Rest

7mi run

Rest or Cross-train 30min

4/11

6mi run

Rest

12x20sec sprints with 2min recovery

Cross-train 45min

Rest

7mi run

Rest or Cross-train 30min

4/18

6mi run

Rest

4mi run

Cross-train 45min

Rest

6mi run

Rest or Cross-train 30min

4/25

5mi run

Rest

4mi run

Rest

3mi run

Rest

RACE DAY

10K Beginner

Week of:

Day 1

Day 2

Day 3

Day 4

Day 5

Day 6

Day 7

3/23

2.5mi run

Rest

2.5mi run

Rest

Cross-train 30min

3mi run

Rest or Cross-train 30min

3/30

2.5mi run

Rest

3mi run

Rest

Cross-train 30min

3mi run

Rest or Cross-train 30min

4/6

2.5mi run

Rest

3mi run

Rest

Cross-train 30min

3.5mi run

Rest or Cross-train 30min

4/13

3mi run

Rest

3mi run

Rest

Cross-train 35min

4mi run

Rest or Cross-train 30min

4/20

3mi run

Rest

3mi run

Rest

Cross-train 35min

5mi run

Rest or Cross-train 30min

4/27

3mi run

Rest

5x3min TI with 3min recovery

Rest

Cross-train 40min

5mi run

Rest or Cross-train 30min

4/4

3mi run

Rest

5x4min TI with 4min recovery

Rest

Cross-train 40min

5mi run

Rest or Cross-train 30min

4/11

4mi run

Rest

8x30sec sprints with 90sec recovery

Rest

Cross-train 45min

6mi run

Rest or Cross-train 30min

4/18

4mi run

Rest

5mi run

Rest

Cross-train 45min

4mi run

Rest or Cross-train 30min

4/25

5mi run

Rest

4mi run

Rest

3mi run

Rest

RACE DAY

10k Intermediate

Week of:

Day 1

Day 2

Day 3

Day 4

Day 5

Day 6

Day 7

3/23

4mi run

Cross-train 30min

4mi run

Rest

4mi run

3mi run

Rest

3/30

4mi run

Cross-train 35min

4mi run

Rest

5mi run

3mi run

Rest

4/6

5mi run

Cross-train 35min

4mi run

Rest

6mi run

3mi run

Rest

4/13

5mi run

Cross-train 40min

5x4min TI with 4min recovery

Rest

7mi run

3mi run

Rest

4/20

5mi run

Cross-train 40min

5x5min TI with 5min recovery

Rest

7mi run

4mi run

Rest

4/27

5mi run

Cross-train 45min

6x3min TI with 3min recovery

Rest

8mi run

4mi run

Rest

4/4

6mi run

Cross-train 45min

7x2min TI with 3min recovery

Rest

8mi run

4mi run

Rest

4/11

6mi run

Cross-train 45min

8x1min TI with 2min recovery

Rest

9mi run

4mi run

Rest

4/18

6mi run

Cross-train 45min

4mi run

Rest

6mi run

4mi run

Rest

4/25

6mi run

Rest

5mi run

Rest

4mi run

Rest

RACE DAY

Half-Marathon Beginner

Week of:

Day 1

Day 2

Day 3

Day 4

Day 5

Day 6

Day 7

3/23

4mi run

4mi run

Rest

3mi run

Cross-train 30min

5mi run

Rest

3/30

4mi run

4mi run

Rest

4mi run

Cross-train 30min

6mi run

Rest

4/6

4mi run

5mi run

Rest

4mi run

Rest or Cross-train 35min

6mi run

Rest

4/13

5mi run

5mi run

Rest

4mi run

Rest or Cross-train 35min

7mi run

Rest

4/20

5mi run

5mi run

Rest

4mi run

Rest or Cross-train 40min

8mi run

Rest

4/27

5mi run

5mi run

Rest

5mi run

Rest or Cross-train 40min

8mi run

Rest

4/4

5mi run

6mi run

Rest

5mi run

Rest or Cross-train 40min

9mi run

Rest

4/11

6mi run

6mi run

Rest

5mi run

Rest or Cross-train 45min

10mi run

Rest

4/18

6mi run

5mi run

Rest

6mi run

Rest or Cross-train 45min

5mi run

Rest

4/25

6mi run

Rest

5mi run

Rest

4mi run

Rest

RACE DAY

Half-Marathon Intermediate

Week of:

Day 1

Day 2

Day 3

Day 4

Day 5

Day 6

Day 7

3/23

4mi run

Cross-train 30min

4mi run

Rest

4mi run

6mi run

Rest

3/30

5mi run

Cross-train 30min

4mi run

Rest

5mi run

6mi run

Rest

4/6

5mi run

Cross-train 35min

5mi run

Rest

5mi run

7mi run

Rest

4/13

5mi run

Cross-train 35min

5mi run

Rest

6mi run

8mi run

Rest

4/20

5mi run

Cross-train 40min

6mi run

Rest

6mi run

9mi run

Rest

4/27

6mi run

Cross-train 40min

6mi run

Rest

6mi run

10mi run

Rest

4/4

6mi run

Cross-train 45min

7mi run

Rest

5mi run

11mi run

Rest

4/11

6mi run

Cross-train 45min

7mi run

Rest

5mi run

12mi run

Rest

4/18

6mi run

Cross-train 30min

6mi run

Rest

6mi run

8mi run

Rest

4/25

6mi run

Rest

6mi run

Rest

4mi run

Rest

RACE DAY

All Programs:

*normal run days – choose a comfortable pace in which it would be easy to hold a conversation at.

*TI = Tempo Intervals. These should be at a maximal steady state effort, or in other words, hold the fastest pace possible throughout every interval. (The first interval should be the same pace as your last). This is a high intensity workout but make sure you do not go out too fast on your first interval as you may not be able to hold that pace. Recovery is a light jog.

*Speed work (20 or 30sec intervals) are sprints but again, you want all intervals to be at a pretty equal pace. If anything make your last few your fastest.

*Run/walk intervals – the running portion should be slightly faster than your normal run days. Don’t be afraid to push yourself a little!

*Cross-training – low to moderate intensity workouts of your choice.

*Resistance training can be personalized by your trainer to fit your needs and goal.

25k

Week of:

Day 1

Day 2

Day 3

Day 4

Day 5

Day 6

Day 7

3/23

4mi run

Rest or Cross-train 30min

4mi run

Rest

6mi run

4mi run

Rest

3/30

4mi run

Rest or Cross-train 30min

4mi run

Rest

7mi run

5mi run

Rest

4/6

5mi run

4mi max steady state

Rest or Cross-train 30min

Rest or Cross-train 30min

7mi run

7mi run

Rest

4/13

5mi run

5mi max steady state

Rest or Cross-train 30min

Rest or Cross-train 30min

8mi run

8mi run

Rest

4/20

6mi run

5mi max steady state

Rest or Cross-train 30min

Rest or Cross-train 30min

9mi run

9mi run

Rest

4/27

6mi run

Rest or Cross-train

6mi run

Rest

7mi run

7mi run

Rest

4/4

7mi run

6mi run

Rest

5mi run

Rest

RACE DAY

5mi run

*Max steady state = run at your fastest pace that you can maintian throughout the entire run.

*On the consecutive “Rest or Cross-train” days, choose one day to rest and one to cross-train light.

*On normal run days, keep your heart rate low (125-135bpm).

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